Posts Tagged ‘The Fenimore Art Museum’

ArtBeat: Maxfield Parrish @ the Fenimore Art Museum [Get Visual]

Wednesday, July 29th, 2015
Maxfield Parrish - Masquerade oil on board 1922

Maxfield Parrish – Masquerade oil on board 1922

Review by David Brickman

If you think an exhibition of work by an early-20th-century illustrator with broad commercial appeal is not to be taken seriously, think again. “Maxfield Parrish: Art of Light and Illusion,” on view at Cooperstown’s Fenimore Art Museum through September 7, is a knockout.

Maxfield Parrish was the most popular and highest paid commercial artist of his time and, judging from the art, artifacts and facts on display here, he earned it. While skill alone never makes great art, it can’t hurt – and Parrish had enough skill for 10 great artists. Initially educated through his artist father’s tutelage and a seminal two-year European sojourn as a teen, Parrish first took an architecture degree, then went to study under Howard Pyle, himself a memorable illustrator of the day, before embarking on a career that revolutionized the field of commercial art reproduction.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.


ArtBeat: Three exhibitions at the Fenimore Art Museum [Get Visual]

Wednesday, August 31st, 2011
Maurice Prendergast: Landscape with Figures

Maurice Prendergast: Landscape with Figures

Hurricanes notwithstanding, it’s a nice time of year for a drive to Cooperstown – and with three special exhibitions all ending soon at the Fenimore Art Museum, there’s plenty of reason to make the trip now.

Fans of the Mexican proto-feminist painter Frida Kahlo will be entranced by a traveling show titled Frida Kahlo: through the lens of Nickolas Muray, which centers on pictures of the enigmatic artist taken throughout her 10-year love affair with the Hungarian-born, New York City-based photographer.

Augmented by inkjet prints of titillating ephemera such as lipstick-kissed letters, the show is not much more than an illustrated soap opera, strangely cool yet passionate, though Muray’s estimable skills with both classic black-and-white and early color technique are brilliantly on display. It’s easy to see from this collection why people such as Salma Hayek and Madonna find Frida so irresistible, though I was equally repelled by the degree of self-indulgence in evidence. If you’re intrigued, you must hurry: The show ends on Sept. 5.

Click to read the rest of this story at Get Visual.

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