Posts Tagged ‘Romeo and Juliet’

A Fearless “Romeo and Juliet” Takes to the Road from Hubbard Hall to the People of NY & VT [Berkshire on Stage]

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014
Romeo and Juliet played by actors who are teens themselves.

Romeo and Juliet played by actors who are teens themselves.

Hubbard Hall Center for the Arts is about to set out on its 20th Free Outdoor Shakespeare Tour. The acting company is bringing Shakespeare’s most famous and popular play not only to its own community but to many other cities and towns in New York and Vermont.

Two young kids in love, running towards each other quicker than they can think…
With the world against them and their hearts entwined,
Their families fight,
Adults try to drive them apart,
Until tragedy – and wondering – how could this have happened?

This fun, fast-paced Romeo and Juliet, directed by Hubbard Hall’s new Executive Director David Snider, will bring the world of the play to vibrant life in 10 beautiful settings. With minimal props and costumes, the focus will be on the words, the actions, the actors and the setting. Each site will inform the production, with an emphasis on a fierce, fearless tackling of Shakespeare’s world and words. Actual teenagers will play Romeo and Juliet. With a mix of young talent and seasoned professionals, this company will mix Shakespeare’s world with our own, exploring how age, authority, religion and family continue to shape us – and what can happen when generations collide, or at least fail to communicate.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

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LIVE: Daniela Varon’s “Romeo and Juliet” a Mashup at Shakespeare & Company [Berkshire on Stage]

Tuesday, July 19th, 2011
(photo by Kevin Sprague)

(photo by Kevin Sprague)

Some familiar stories can be made new though theatrical innovations. Especially those written by the masters of the form: Shakespeare, Ibsen and Chekhov. This summer you will find one of the most innovative Romeo and Juliet‘s in years at Shakespeare & Company. Much of it is quite wonderful. But it also derails now and then.

The unwilling participants in this experiment are Romeo and Juliet themselves. Wrenched from the relative comfort of sixteenth century Verona, their costumes bleached out in most scenes to ghostly white, director Daniela Varon takes a young cast on an amazing journey into her personal imagination.

Much of it works brilliantly as theatre, but some of the director’s creative touches border on the absurd, or simply don’t work. At the end, for example, Romeo finds Juliet like all the other corpses in the tomb, sitting upright. He takes his own poison, and promptly dies, also sitting upright. This strains the notion of “suspending disbelief” the contract that audiences make with themselves to enjoy a play.

Click to read the rest of this story at Berkshire on Stage.

LIVE: “Romeo and Juliet” @ Shakespeare & Company, Lenox [Gailsez]

Tuesday, July 19th, 2011
The cast of "Romeo and Juliet" at the play's final moment, with Paris (Wolfe Coleman), Romeo (David Gelles), and Juliet (Susannah Millonzi) dead in the foreground (photo: Kevin Sprague)

The cast of "Romeo and Juliet" at the play's final moment, with Paris (Wolfe Coleman), Romeo (David Gelles), and Juliet (Susannah Millonzi) dead in the foreground (photo: Kevin Sprague)

This is the fifth production of Romeo and Juliet that I had been called upon to write about in the past four years – I saw it at Main Street Stage in 2008, at Shakespeare & Company in 2009, at NYSTI and Bakerloo last year, and now at Shakespeare & Company…again.

While the Company is promoting this as their first Main Stage production since 1999, they have performed it on other stages in the interim, most recently on the Bernstein stage in a bare-bones production that toured schools in New England all winter before returning home to Lenox to open the 2009 season. It was a very nice production, and designed for folks with short attention spans – which may be most of us these days – it ran a full hour shorter than this staging. I have to say that I don’t enjoy sitting in the theatre for more than three hours, and this production clocks in at three hours and twenty minutes. And since all the light-hearted moments come before intermission and you know how it ends – that last 30-45 minutes is kind of torturous.

Click to read the rest of this story at GailSez.

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