Posts Tagged ‘Lenox’

Review: “It’s a Wonderful Life” Returns to Shakespeare & Company [Berkshire on Stage]

Monday, December 15th, 2014
It’s a Wonderful Life: The Radio Play runs from Dec. 5-28. (photo: Enrico Spada)

It’s a Wonderful Life: The Radio Play runs from Dec. 5-28. (photo: Enrico Spada)

Theater review and discussion by Gail M. Burns and Larry Murray (Reprinted from the December 12, 2013 review)

Larry Murray: What can be more fitting for the holidays than It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play which is the story of idealistic George Bailey as he considers ending his life one fateful Christmas Eve. Do you agree that Shakespeare & Company in Lenox captured all the magic of Frank Capra’s classic 1946 holiday film It’s a Wonderful Life in this production?

Gail M. Burns: Darned if I know. I am one of the few adult Americans who has never seen the film all the way through. This iteration, adapted by Joe Landry from the screenplay by Francis Goodrich, Albert Hackett, Frank Capra, and Jo Swerling, reimagines the story as performed by five stalwart radio actors on a snowy Christmas Eve when the sound effects guy gets stuck in the blizzard and can’t get to the studio. We, the studio audience for the broadcast, get the fun of watching them cope with the emergency and perform all the music and sound effects as well as the well-worn story of George Bailey.

Larry: Landry didn’t miss a single plot point of the film, and the five actors created the dozens of characters with just their voices. It was astonishing to hear Ryan Winkles change his voice instantly from Clarence the angel (second class) to Bert the cop. He played a dozen roles, as did favorite Jonathan Croy and the amazing Jennie M. Jadow. These chameleons changed accent, tone and cadence from one character to the next like racers taking the hairpin turn on the Mohawk Trail.

Gail: David Joseph and Sarah Jeanette Taylor anchor the story as George Bailey and the woman he marries, Mary Hatch. They also provide much of the charming music, with Taylor on piano and Joseph as the lead vocalist. The whole show, but especially the music, was charming in its simplicity and beauty, with many songs sung virtually a cappella. Joseph plinks out a few notes on the xylophone and Winkles bravely tackles a trombone riff, but Jadow on violin and Taylor on piano provide the melodic lines.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

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Sheryl Crow in Concert with Boston Pops Added to Tanglewood 2015 Line-up [Berkshire on Stage]

Thursday, December 11th, 2014

Sheryl Crow

Nine-time Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter Sheryl Crow will join Keith Lockhart and the Boston Pops at Tanglewood in Lenox on June 19, 2015, at 8:30pm, for a concert performance to help kick off Tanglewood’s 2015 season. She last appeared at Tanglewood in concert with James Taylor and Yo-Yo Ma in August, 2009.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

James Taylor Returns to Tanglewood for July 4th with All-Star Band, Fireworks [Berkshire on Stage]

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014
The Berkshires love James Taylor’s appearances at Tanglewood as much as those of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

The Berkshires love James Taylor’s appearances at Tanglewood as much as those of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

James Taylor returns to Tanglewood in 2015 with his All-Star Band for a performance on Saturday, July 4, at 7pm in the Koussevitzky Music Shed, followed by a spectacular fireworks display over the Stockbridge Bowl in celebration of the Independence Day holiday.

The July 4 performance will include many of the iconic songs so closely associated with Mr. Taylor, as well as new original material from his forthcoming album — his first in a decade — to be released in 2015. Mr. Taylor, who regularly performs to sold-out audiences at Tanglewood, has returned to the festival 23 times since his first performance there in 1974.

Tickets for the July 4 concert by James Taylor, priced from $26 (lawn tickets) to $103, go on sale January 24 at 10am at 888-266-1200 or www.tanglewood.org, where visitors can also find full details of the 2015 Tanglewood concert schedule, including performances by the Boston Symphony and Boston Pops orchestras, the Tanglewood Music Center and guest artists from the worlds of classical, jazz, the American Songbook, Broadway, pop rock, dance and film. Tanglewood — this country’s preeminent summer music festival and the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra — is located in the Berkshire hills between Stockbridge and Lenox.

WAM Theatre’s “In Darfur” Places the Audience Right in the Middle of a War Zone [Berkshire on Stage]

Friday, November 7th, 2014
A gripping story, based on actual events.

A gripping story, based on actual events

Review by Larry Murray

WAM Theatre presents “IN DARFUR” by Winter Miller; directed by Kristen van Ginhoven; coordinating producer – Jessica Provenz; scenic designer – JulianaVon Haubrich; costume designer – Govane Lohbauer; lighting designer – Natalie Robin; sound and projections design – Brad Berridge; fight director – Douglas Seldin.
Cast – Maryke – Tricia Alexandro; Jan/Ensemble – Christina Gordon; Male Ensemble – Marcus D. Harvey; Hamida – Shannon Harris; Male Ensemble/Fight Caprain – Warren Jackson; Carlos – Rich Lounello; Hawa – Sipiwe Moyo. 90 minutes, no intermission. October 30-November 16, 2014. At the Berry Family Studio at the Elayne P. Bernstein Center on the campus of Shakespeare and Company located at 70 Kemble Street in Lenox, MA. http://www.wamtheatre.com or call the box office at 413-637-3353.

That genocide exists in our modern civilization is almost unfathomable. Isn’t mankind better than this?

From the comfort of our homes we find it difficult to grasp how the human mind can justify the killing of thousands of others just because they are different. How can people’s capacity for compassion be so often overwhelmed by a hatred of the “other” – those of a different religion, nationality or just some poor folks who are taking up too much space on land you covet.

WAM Theatre, which is located in the bucolic Berkshires of Massachusetts, chose Winter Miller’s difficult play IN DARFUR for its fifth season offering, and which is currently being performed in the Berry Family Studio at the Elayne P. Bernstein Center at Shakespeare & Company through Sunday, November 16. Brilliantly staged by Kristen van Ginhoven, it is an immersive theatrical experience that begins long before you enter the playing space itself: the hallways themselves are lined with fencing, signage and the accumulated rubbish of a hastily organized refugee camp.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

“Stonewall” DIldine and the Mess at Shakespeare & Company [Berkshire on Stage]

Monday, October 20th, 2014
Stonewall Dildine’s answer to all questions: “”We don’t discuss personnel matters.”

Stonewall Dildine’s answer to all questions: “We don’t discuss personnel matters.”

By Larry Murray

For more than a week, the board and management of Shakespeare & Company in Lenox have evaded every question about the sudden departure of artistic director Tony Simotes. It has also refused to give any indication of whether this signals a major reorganization of the theatre company, and just who is going to be next on the chopping block. The order to be silent has reverberated throughout the company and many of the founders and long-term members fear that if they open their mouth, they will lose their jobs. It seems that heads are going to roll soon, and that worries me as a veteran theater watcher who has a great love for this venerable company of actors.

Secrecy and stonewalling are a familiar form of corporate politics. Whether white collar workers or actors, using these sorts of wily tactics always backfires, and has already began to erode the company’s years of reputation and audience building.

Oddly, Shakespeare & Company chose to release the news of Simotes departure with hints of more changes to come in an after-hours news release (original story) late on a Friday night. They probably expected that few would print the news, or – most importantly – that few would notice that the popular Simotes was being unceremoniously ushered out months before his contract ends despite promises to the contrary. There were few details, just the usual meaningless niceties that accompany such corporate beheadings. My own attempts to glean more information were rebuffed even when such attempts were done using personal email rather than official ShakesCo email address which were undoubtedly being monitored for leaks.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

A Man and a Devil Battle It Out at the Church on the Hill on Sunday [Berkshire on Stage]

Friday, October 3rd, 2014
Glen Williamson (photo: Robb Creese)

Glen Williamson (photo: Robb Creese)

Goethe’s “Faust” is one of the bedrocks of classic literature. Its story of a deal with the devil – signed in your own blood – still resonates today. Written two centuries ago, it is a rich vein of philosophical thought. And it’s about to be become relevent to us once again in a modern retelling in Lenox where people like their theater rich and deep.

Taking place on Sunday (October 5) at 2pm, a man and a devil will battle it out at the Church on the Hill in Lenox, as professional New York actor Glen Williamson performs his award-winning one-man play Beat the Devil! Faust, the Whole Story. The piece won the award for Best Adaptation at the United Solo Theatre Festival Off-Broadway in 2011. The Church on the Hill presents the Anthropos Theater production of Goethe’s theatrical masterpiece about about love, sex, murder, myth, magic, war, waves and a devil out of his depths. The Hadley Lyre Ensemble will play live music from Colin Tanser, J.S. Bach, and a piece composed especially for this event by Channa A. Seidenberg.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

THEATER: “Private Eyes” @ ShakesCo Is a Befuddling Tangle of Lovers and Cheaters. Or Is It… [Berkshire on Stage]

Tuesday, September 30th, 2014
The Company of Private Eye (photo: Enrico Spada)

The Company of Private Eye (photo: Enrico Spada)

Theater review by Gail M. Burns and Larry Murray

Gail M. Burns: I had to be reminded that I had seen and reviewed a production of this play fifteen years ago, also at Shakespeare & Company in Lenox. Although I liked it at the time, it was not a memorable experience.

Larry Murray: Private Eyes is an odd concoction for sure, with some of the wittiest comedy and clever aphorisms of the current fall season. Written by Steven Dietz, the revival of Private Eyes features a fresh look and much younger cast from when the Company staged it in 1999 in the Stables Theatre at The Mount. There is one rather unmissable change, however, since the therapist Frank played then by Robert D. Lohbauer has had a sex change and is now played by Lori Evans Pugh. In your prophetic earlier review (link) you advised audiences to be prepared to go through the looking glass.

Gail: For all its twists and turns, Matthew (Luke Reed) is the central character and whatever happens happens to him, whether in fantasy or reality. Another solid bit of reality here is that Matthew and Lisa (Caroline Calkins) are married, or were married during much of the action of the play. Lisa may, or may not, be having or have had an affair with Adrian (Marcus Kearns), an insufferable British director who has cast the couple in an unnamed romantic comedy. Adrian’s wife (Elizabeth ‘Lily’ Cardaropoli) may be stalking her erstwhile husband in various disguises, or the whole thing may be a series of semi-fantastic stories Matthew spins for his psychiatrist, Frank (Pugh.)

Larry: Jonathan Croy is at work here as the director, which means that when there is fun, it’s rib-splittingly funny and where there is tragedy, it fully shocks and dismays. Everything is topsy turvy in this Diet-zy concoction. In the program notes, the director says that Private Eyes is a delicate Swiss watch of a play, moving gracefully through time and memory.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

Love! Passion! Deception! Get All Twisted Together in “Private Eyes” at S&Co [Berkshire on Stage]

Monday, September 15th, 2014
The cast of “Private Eyes” at Shakespeare & Company. (photo: Kevin Sprague)

The cast of “Private Eyes” at Shakespeare & Company (photo: Kevin Sprague)

It may be true that Caroline Calkins and Marcus Kearns played opposite each other in the appealing roles of Romeo and Juliet earlier this season at The Mount, but this hilarious thriller directed by Jonathon Croy is nothing like that. In fact, Private Eyes, written by Steven Dietz, has been described as a romantic comedy in which what’s real inevitably turns out to be an illusion. It’s a play within a play, within a play, within a play within a psychiatrist’s office — a Chinese box full of tricks and surprises.

Who can doubt that Croy is the perfect kind of director for this sort of mind-bending take on romance?

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

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