Posts Tagged ‘Get Visual’

Mary Pat Wager @ Albany Center Gallery [Get Visual]

Friday, November 14th, 2014
Mary Pat Water: Solitary Confinement, 2014

Mary Pat Wager: Solitary Confinement, 2014

Review by David Brickman

In the great tradition that Albany Center Gallery has become in its 35+ years of existence, the current retrospective by sculptor Mary Pat Wager is a big, sprawling show of important work covering a span of several decades. Wager is a familiar face on the regional art scene including at past ACG shows, but this major exhibition is still a long time coming and a welcome sight.

Featuring scores of works from 1978 through 2014, Collections: A Retrospective was independently curated by Jackie Weaver and includes wall-hung and free-standing pieces in steel, wood, copper, bone, bronze, stone, brass, glass, paper, and more, usually combining several of these materials in one piece. It’s organized clutter, marvelously inventive, sophisticated-yet-direct assemblage by an inveterate collector (some would say hoarder) of stuff.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

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Theme and Variations: Gail Nadeau @ FMCC [Get Visual]

Wednesday, November 5th, 2014
Gail Nadeau: Diamond Studded Dress with Rock

Gail Nadeau: Diamond Studded Dress with Rock

Review by David Brickman

The show Angelus by Gail Nadeau at the Perrella Gallery of Fulton-Montgomery Community College in Johnstown raises a lot of wonderful questions. The very talented Nadeau works in digital media as well as traditional forms such as silver-based photography and oil paint, and all are present in this 60-piece installation.

Is it a retrospective? Well, there are images from 1985, 2014 and in-between. But, no, it’s not a retrospective. Is Nadeau a photographer, a painter, or what? Well, she does show photographs here, and very painterly mixed-media pieces. But, no, I wouldn’t call her either a photographer or a painter. Rather, I think printmaker would be the correct term.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

Catching Up with the Albany Institute [Get Visual]

Friday, September 12th, 2014
A view of the Small + Seductive installation

A view of the Small + Seductive installation

By David Brickman

We’ve all been there – you’re aware of a show you know you want to see, and it has a long run, so you leave it till later because you know you have plenty of time to catch it before it closes … and then, inevitably, time goes by and, in the best of circumstances, you catch the show on its last day – or, more likely, miss it forever.

That’s how, on Sunday, I caught the last day of a fine show of five photographers at the Albany Institute of History & Art, and then took the opportunity to peruse an ongoing exhibition called Small + Seductive, which continues through September 28. Featuring about 50 works of art (a few of which are multiple-piece series) by 37 artists, Small + Seductive is the third in a recent series of shows from AIHA’s collection of contemporary art. The first of that trio included only photographs (full disclosure: two of those were mine) while the second was made up of large-scale work in more traditional fine art media.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

“Body Language” and “Homespun” Inhabit Public Spaces [Get Visual]

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014
Sang Wook Lee: Fork and Knife, 2014, silk, silkscreen  and hand embroidered cotton thread

Sang Wook Lee: Fork and Knife, 2014, silk, silkscreen
and hand embroidered cotton thread

Reviews by David Brickman

When Howard Schultz bought Starbucks in 1983, his goal for the business was to provide “a third place between work and home,” where people would meet, work and relax, thereby forming a sense of community in a coffee-shop setting. A similar process goes on in art spaces, which can range from elegant museums to commercial galleries to – you got it – coffee shops, and which also provide the opportunity to form a sense of community. The greater Capital Region offers many options in that range, and they all contribute significantly to a vibrant scene that I think is underappreciated both within and beyond this geography.

Get Visual aims to explore and expound upon that scene (with occasional digressions beyond), and I am pleased to be returning to it after a long hiatus. This post will be the first of many to come under a new plan to write as often as possible around my full-time job – probably just once or twice a month but, at least, regularly. Please spread the word to your interested friends.

Two shows that recently caught my attention happen to share important characteristics, though they are distinct. Presented neither in museum nor commercial settings, these shows each occupy a type of “third place” in the exhibition realm: spaces that are devoted to significant public purposes apart from art, but which also host high-quality, curated exhibitions.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Best Shows of 2011 [Get Visual]

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011
Jeanne Pissarro: Cocotte, Reading

Camille Pissarro: Cocotte, Reading

It’s a time for looking forward and a time for looking back. As I check last year’s Best Shows post, it amazes me how much things have changed as well as how much they have remained the same, at least for Get Visual.

At this time a year ago, I was crowing about how much traffic had increased on the site during its second full year. Well, this third year has seen the traffic rate double, tallying about 40,000 page views in 2011, with a peak of just under 5,000 for the month of November. Admittedly, a good number of those are probably just folks in Uzbekistan trolling for Norman Rockwell images to steal – but, hey, I’m not choosy!

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

Dualities: Martha Bone and Bart Gulley at Architecture for Art [Get Visual]

Friday, December 9th, 2011
Painting by Bart Gulley from Black and Blue series

Painting by Bart Gulley from Black and Blue series

On a recent visit to Architecture for Art in Hillsdale, Bart Gulley and I discussed dualities as I perused his two-person show with Martha Bone in the two-floor exhibition space. It was our first meeting and my first time at AforA, so there was a lot to take in and digest. AforA director Liane Torre was also on hand, explaining the unlikely genesis a year ago of this brick-and-mortar setting from a longer-term, ongoing web-based project of the same name.

Gulley’s work first caught my eye in the 2011 Exhibition by Artists of the Mohawk Hudson Region at the Albany Institute of History & Art (see review here); he makes Modernist paintings and collages with great purity, having evolved from a more Expressionist style in what appears to be a reductive maturation process. The work is crisp, clear, and somewhat dry at times, but seethes with a passion beneath the expertly rendered surfaces.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Victoria Palermo: RAUM at John Davis Gallery (and other Hudson shows) [Get Visual]

Friday, December 2nd, 2011
Victoria Palermo: cant and wont

Victoria Palermo: cant and wont

Here’s a heads-up for serious followers of contemporary art: There’s less than a week left to see the exhibition Victoria Palermo: RAUM at John Davis Gallery in Hudson, and you don’t want to miss it. If Palermo is new to you, this is as good a time as any to start following her work; or if, like me, you’ve followed her career for decades, you will be deeply gratified to see this amazing new work.

Palermo (no relation to Blinky), has always worked intimately with color – painted onto found sticks, poured onto paper from a nail-polish bottle, printed in patterns like wallpaper or, in this case, infused into the jellylike body of sheets of pure silicone rubber. Equally, Palermo works with form – her work relates to abstract approaches, but never completely leaves the referential realm – and she is as much a designer as she is an artist. In other words, she has always carefully constructed her pieces, even though there is also a degree of expressive freedom in them.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Kiki Smith and Whiting Tennis @ The Tang [Get Visual]

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011
Kiki Smith: I Myself Have Seen It @ The Tang Teaching Museum

Two artists of both shared and contrasting sensibilities are presented in solo shows at Skidmore College’s Tang Teaching Museum through the end of the year. Kiki Smith is by far the more famous and influential of the two; her show did not originate at the Tang, having been brought in from the Henry Art Gallery at the University of Washington in Seattle. Whiting Tennis, who hails from Seattle himself, is the subject of a Tang “Opener,” whereby the museum’s curators make a point of introducing an artist not previously broadly exposed in this area. So we have the known and the unknown side by side; the Seattle connection may be intended or not.

I Myself Have Seen It: Photography and Kiki Smith includes a very great number of photographs, but it also features sculptures, drawings, prints and mixed media, all of which are what the artist is widely known for producing. She is considered a feminist, in that her work runs counter to male-dominated viewpoints regarding the female body in art, and she is clearly very much of her time – a child of the ’60s and ’70s, wild and undisciplined in many ways.

The installation of I Myself Have Seen It is highly structured, however (see view at the top of this post), prominently featuring a narrow ledge at the bottom edge of the gallery’s walls that supports an array of countless 4×6-inch color prints in minimal plastic box-frames, running like a subtitled narrative below the entire text of the exhibition. On the walls are many larger, properly framed photographs, as well as the other works, in great big groups and sequences.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

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