Posts Tagged ‘David Brickman’

Nicholas Krushenick @ Skidmore College’s Tang Museum [Get Visual]

Friday, April 10th, 2015
Installation view featuring the painting titled Electric Soup at left.

Installation view featuring the painting titled “Electric Soup” at left

Review by David Brickman

It was 1979: Punk rock was at its peak, rents in SoHo were still cheap, and Nick Krushenick was nearly a forgotten man. My college painting class was on a field trip to New York City, where a visit to Krushenick’s studio had been arranged. The artist showed little enthusiasm, reluctantly pulling a few paintings from a leaning stack, far less interested in talking about his work than he was in bragging about his son’s band, which had just cut their first record.

Flash forward to 2015, and the late Krushenick is now the subject of a solo show at Skidmore College’s Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery, such a rarity that the 20 major pieces it has brought together represent the biggest collection of his work ever seen publicly. Nicholas Krushenick: Electric Soup, on view through Sunday, August 16, is a brash, bold exhibition that spans over 30 years of output with pristine, large-scale acrylics that appear so fresh they just about jump right off the wall.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

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The 37th Annual Photography Regional @ the Opalka Gallery [Get Visual]

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015
Beau Comeaux: Rubble

Beau Comeaux: “Rubble”

By David Brickman

The 37th Annual Photography Regional is both a glimpse of the past and a window on the future. Hosted this year by the Sage Colleges’ Opalka Gallery in Albany, the Photo Regional’s present iteration is a truly fresh experience that also speaks clearly to the show’s long and influential history.

Featuring 80 works by 39 artists, the show was ably and amiably judged by the collaborating duo Robert and Shana ParkeHarrison, who filled the capacious gallery with a broad sampling of styles, often choosing three or more pieces by individual makers, which gives the show a welcome depth often missing from such juried affairs. Prizes, chosen by the ParkeHarrisons, went to nine recipients, including two prizes given to student work, a first for the Regional in my memory.

Overall, I got some very strong impressions of where art photography is at in 2015, and I liked what I saw: A lot of black-and-white work (whether digital or traditional); a good amount of strong color abstraction; a great deal of personal documentary; and some experimental/technical stuff – but very little of what I would call “postmodern,” especially of the often annoying “created to be photographed” genre.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

Adirondack Artists Guild’s 17th Annual Juried Art Competition [Get Visual]

Monday, March 23rd, 2015
BEST IN SHOW: Elaine Vollherbst - Highway 28N Long Lake

BEST IN SHOW: Elaine Vollherbst’s “Highway 28N Long Lake”

By David Brickman

Last weekend I had the privilege of driving up to Saranac Lake to judge the 17th annual Juried Art Competition at the Adirondack Artists Guild. When I arrived, the Guild’s gallery – a pleasant, functional storefront on Main Street – was crammed with 185 entries in all media. My job was to trim these submissions to about 75 for the show, and to choose prizes to be awarded at the show’s opening reception: Best in Show (which carries with it the opportunity to have a solo exhibition at the gallery in November); 1st, 2nd and 3rd prizes; and five Honorable Mentions. Needless to say, it was a daunting task.

Here’s a first-person account:

Feeling a bit overwhelmed by the quantity (and overall quality) of the entries, I first sought to get my bearings. My hosts were three members of the Guild, a cooperative business whose 15 or so joint owners share the effort, expense, and rewards of such an enterprise, and they were graciously helpful throughout the process. They remained quietly alert as I worked my way around the room two or three times, occasionally answering questions I had as to certain relevant details. At this point, I had not yet begun to cut.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

The Best Films of 2014 [Get Visual]

Friday, February 20th, 2015
Patricia Arquette and Ellar Coltrane in Boyhood

Patricia Arquette and Ellar Coltrane in Boyhood

Reviews by David Brickman

With the awards season in full swing, I’m ready to weigh in on my favorite films of the past year. 2014 was an excellent year for movies, and that shows in the truly tough-to-handicap Oscar races. Luckily, I have so far seen six of the eight Best Picture nominees, and they are all worth the time. I’ve missed American Sniper and Selma, but plan to see the former very soon. As for the latter, I’m just not that interested in a dramatic alteration of Civil Rights history, so I’m skipping it.

1. Boyhood - How anybody can not be completely blown away by the achievement of this 12-year project by Richard Linklater is beyond me. It’s a drama about a kid growing up, in which all the actors actually age in real time through the course of the filming. More than that – it’s a really great life story, beautifully performed. Patricia Arquette will win the Oscar for this one, and if Linklater doesn’t, it’s simply wrong.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Mike Glier at Opalka Gallery [Get Visual]

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015
An image by Mike Glier

An image by Mike Glier

Review by David Brickman

The title of the current show at Sage College of Albany’s Opalka Gallerymeander, because you can’t see much while marching – could simply express a philosophy, but I feel it also aims to serve as a sort of explanation. This 35-year survey of Mike Glier – extended till Sunday (February 8) – features several rather disparate bodies of work – the titular meandering – each of which displays technical mastery, intellectual rigor, and engaged passion. Glier paints, brilliantly. Glier draws, with consummate ease. Glier conceptualizes, deeply and effectively.

But there remains the sticky problem of Glier’s diversity, and it can’t be overlooked. We want our artists clearly recognizable – the market dictates this, and people’s overworked minds and hearts demand it. How then do we view an artist who refuses to present a unified vision, who is – inconstant?

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

2014 Exhibition by Artists of the Mohawk-Hudson Region [Get Visual]

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015
Jeanette Fintz: Traveler's Reflection 3

Jeanette Fintz: Traveler’s Reflection 3

Review by David Brickman

The annual Exhibition by Artists of the Mohawk-Hudson Region, hosted this year by the Albany Institute of History & Art, raises the usual set of questions while presenting the usual confounding mash-up of regional art.

Popularly known as the Regional, this show has been running for nearly 80 years, making it one of the longest-standing exhibitions of its kind in the U.S. It’s always an annual high point for fans of the local art scene, and can be either a high point or a low point for participants, depending on their success in entering, personal taste, or overall degree of crankiness. This year’s edition was mounted on a later schedule than the usual summer appearance and will be up through Monday, January 19, affording a nice opportunity for the procrastinators among us to see it, even as 2015 has arrived.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

Books: A Novel, Photographs and Poetry [Get Visual]

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

Sputnik Summer

By David Brickman

Though it isn’t a picture book, Paul Castellani’s Sputnik Summer features a great photo by Adirondack photographer Carl Heilman II on the cover, and its author and his wife, Donna, are great modern art enthusiasts who attend a lot of openings, so it caught my attention.

Castellani is a professor by trade, but his academic roots stay pretty well hidden in this coming-of-age novel that takes place in the late ’50s in a fading Adirondack resort town where a somewhat typical 17-year-old boy tries to come to terms with the limits of his hick town, the crummy summer resort his abusive dad runs, his own college ambitions, and the need to get laid.

The story is punctuated by news bits and advertising slogans taken straight from the publications of the day, which provides a sort of parallel narrative that suggests political and social commentary without offering it directly. Castellani is an excellent storyteller, and he keeps you interested in the twists and turns of this intelligent but inexperienced young man’s rather fateful last summer at home. Put simply: I enjoyed the book and so, probably, will you or the person you decide to give it to.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith @ Union College’s Mandeville Gallery [Get Visual]

Monday, November 24th, 2014
Jaune Quick-to-See

This contemporary take on the Sisyphus myth, titled “Sissy and the Plutocrats,” is, at six by eight feet, the largest painting in the Jaune Quick-to-See Smith show at Union College.

Review by David Brickman

A fine, small show of paintings and prints by the Native American artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith fills Union College’s Mandeville Gallery, situated in the extraordinary Nott Memorial in the center of the college’s campus green. Smith is internationally known for the skillful way she combines primitive, symbolic imagery with modern painterly style, and as an articulate voice for women and Native Americans.

I’ll admit I was not familiar with this artist before hearing about this show, but it lived up to expectations in a number of ways. First, Smith is a mature artist who knows her way around a canvas, and who maintains a sense of humor while addressing socially- and politically-charged issues. Second, the selection presented here is limited in scope, while still being broad enough to satisfy a first-time viewer. So it clearly communicates her vision and messages without being overwhelming.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

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