Posts Tagged ‘David Brickman’

Christo and Jeanne-Claude @ The Hyde [Get Visual]

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016
1976's Running Fence introduced the world to a new kind of environmental artist.

1976’s “Running Fence” introduced the world to a new kind of environmental artist.

By David Brickman

Heads-up! A traveling exhibition titled “Christo and Jeanne-Claude: The Tom Golden Collection” opened last Sunday (May 15) at The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls and will run just six weeks, through Sunday, June 26 – so I recommend you put it on your calendar now.

This event creates many associations for me, most delightfully bringing up the memory of renovations many years ago at the Hyde house that caused it to be fully wrapped in plastic for months on end. I wonder if Hyde administrators remember thinking then, as I did, that it looked just like a Christo project.

It’s also always a treat to see work by this curious duo who helped transform our conception of art from insisting on a housed display into a reluctant embrace of environmental installation on a scale beyond most of our imaginations. The fact that they could even conceive of building a curtain across a valley, or skirting eleven islands with pink polypropylene – much less actually doing it – is a testament to human ingenuity and persistence.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual

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ArtBeat: Mohawk Hudson Regional Invitational @ Albany Center Gallery [Get Visual]

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016
Four very diverse artists are in this year's Mohawk Hudson Regional Invitational at ACG

Four very diverse artists are in this year’s Mohawk Hudson Regional Invitational at ACG

By David Brickman

One of the best shows each year at Albany Center Gallery is the annual invitational drawn from the Mohawk Hudson Regional. It’s a cool idea we don’t see often enough: Gallery representatives visit the big juried show and make notes on whose work they’d like to see more of, then ACG organizes an exhibition of those select picks.

This year’s MHRI at ACG includes four very diverse artists in terms of medium, style – even age – and that’s a good thing. As I am one of the gallery’s board members and the chair of the exhibits committee, I was involved in the selection process – so this won’t be a review. Instead, I will simply recommend the show and suggest you include it in your 1st Friday plans on May 6, when the artists’ reception will be held from 5 pm to 8 pm.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Susan Meyer’s “Formation Proposal” @ Courthouse Gallery [Get Visual]

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016
Detail view of Shaft, laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures, and aluminum

Detail view of “Shaft,” laser cut acrylic, H-O scale figures and aluminum

Review by David Brickman

Several times now I’ve seen one or two of Susan Meyer’s tiny, fantastical utopias and, every time, they fascinate. So I couldn’t bear to miss her solo show Formation Proposal at the Lake George Arts Project’s Courthouse Gallery in Lake George, which is on view only until Friday (April 15).

Meyer uses brightly colored acrylic sheets to build complex little spaces that are populated in this show by miniature nude figures. Her sense of color and form is outstanding, and she fully exploits the way light penetrates these stacks of stripes.

Though dates were not provided for the pieces on view, they seem fresh – especially the central piece – titled “Together” – which is more airy than dense, with a limited palette of white, yellow and blue, and is suspended from the ceiling, so it floats as if in zero-gravity. As one gallery-goer commented during my visit, it looks like The Jetsons. There’s a playfulness here not completely opposed to that favorite 1960s cartoon – but there is also a slightly ominous dystopian feeling to the worlds Meyer creates, adding to their mystique.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Alma Thomas @ Skidmore’s Tang Museum [Get Visual]

Tuesday, April 5th, 2016
Installation view of Alma Thomas at the Tang Teaching Museum. Photo by Arthur Evans.

Installation view of “Alma Thomas” at Skidmore’s Tang Teaching Museum. Photo by Arthur Evans.

Review by David Brickman

I wonder what Alma Thomas’ public school art students thought when, in 1972, their teacher – retired and elderly – became the first African-American woman to have a solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City.

The idea of an artist being that important and, yet, having had to teach school all her life is far from unique, but this extreme case is certainly food for thought. Skidmore College’s Tang Teaching Museum in Saratoga Springs has, in a sense, rescued this delightful painter from obscurity a second time with a sharp, spacious presentation of about two decades’ worth of her work (on view through Sunday, June 5) in a show simply titled Alma Thomas.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: 38th Annual Photography Regional [Get Visual]

Tuesday, March 15th, 2016
A view of the 38th Annual Photography Regional at Fulton Street Gallery

A view of the 38th Annual Photography Regional at Fulton Street Gallery

Review by David Brickman

At the age of 38, the Photography Regional has come full circle. Originally conceived as a counterpoint to the Mohawk-Hudson Regional, which did not accept photography until the early ’90s, the Photo Regional has always been popular with professionals, artists, amateurs, professors and students; and it has always made a splash with audiences, and in local media.

But has it evolved?

The current iteration of the show, at Fulton Street Gallery in Troy through Saturday, April 2, looks and feels eerily like the earliest Photo Regionals – it was mounted this year first as an all-inclusive salon, and then as a juror selection (following the original format); it includes a significant number of the same names that participated in it way back then; the prints and images, though mainly produced with digital technology, look a lot like prints and images of the ’70s; and it is in the same city as the first Photo Regional (which was hosted by the Rensselaer County Council on the Arts, now known as the Arts Center of the Capital Region).

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

Kate Teale: “The Housed” @ Opalka Gallery [Get Visual]

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016
Kate Teale:: (left) Raft 2009; (right) Floating World 2010

Kate Teale:: (left) Raft 2009; (right) Floating World 2010

Review by David Brickman

While lovers enjoyed flowers and chocolates on Valentine’s weekend, I’ve got a different suggestion for lovers of art: good ol’ drawing and painting. In a world overstuffed with postmodernist theorists, it’s a tonic to walk into Sage College of Albany’s Opalka Gallery and see graphite on paper and oils on board by the extremely talented Kate Teale, an English artist now established in New York City, who should be a household name, but was a new discovery for me.

Teale’s exhibition of six graphite drawings and 18 oil paintings, titled The Housed, was curated by Don Desmett at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo and is on tour. It also includes a couple of extremely long (about 30-foot) digital prints from original drawings and a large direct-wall drawing that was executed on-site with student help. The installation suits the high, open space of the Opalka perfectly, allowing the larger works and groupings to breathe, while melding into a cohesive whole that the viewer can digest in reasonable bites.

Teale’s style and technique border on photo-realism; however, she also flirts with formal abstraction, as she explores her subjects of rumpled beds, seascapes, windows and the human form nearly as dispassionately as a scientist studies a lab rat. Not that the work is cold – in fact, it feels intensely personal – but that Teale takes the position of an outsider looking in at herself and her intimate surroundings.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual

ArtBeat: “Photography” @ Carrie Haddad… and Other Hudson Galleries [Get Visual]

Wednesday, January 27th, 2016
Kahn & Selesnick, Oak-Man Falls 2015, archival inkjet print

Kahn & Selesnick, Oak-Man Falls 2015, archival inkjet print

Review by David Brickman

I drove over to Hudson last Sunday to meet a friend for a pizza at Baba Louie’s (it was delicious) and check out the Photography show at Carrie Haddad Gallery. Haddad typically focuses on painting, but her gallery (the longest-standing in Hudson at 25 years old) has always shown photography as well, and this seemed like the perfect opportunity to enjoy a contemporary showcase for the medium.

We were not disappointed, as the exhibition featured a wide array of traditional and postmodern styles, ranging from Jerry Freedner’s bucolic Catskills landscapes to Newbold Bohemia’s tacky domestic dramas and Gail Peachin’s clever, tiny cutouts.

The show includes 12 artists but gives the lion’s share of space to the duo Kahn & Selesnick, whose elaborately detailed fantasies have evolved from neo-antique sepia prints to richly colored inkjets. Just a few of K&S’s new works are monochrome, and those work very well, but here we see mostly color among the 20 images presented and, frankly, it is a bit distracting. That’s because the pictures still evoke timelessness, yet the coloration in most of the prints is noticeably 21st-century.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual

ArtBeat: “Folk Modern” @ Albany International Airport Gallery [Get Visual]

Friday, January 22nd, 2016
Installation of found-object assemblages by Jack Metzger, 2006-2015 (photo: Arthur Evans)

Installation of found-object assemblages by Jack Metzger, 2006-2015 (photo: Arthur Evans)

Review by David Brickman

The creative process can be deceptively simple, but I find exposure to it is almost always uplifting. There’s a delight in seeing how a person, whatever their flaws, can draw from within themselves the strength, imagination, and skill to produce something new and wonderful to behold.

Folk Modern, the current exhibition at Albany International Airport Gallery (on view through Sunday, May 8), explores how eight regional makers (perhaps a better word in this case than “artists”) have delved into that creative impulse and, as such, is a celebration of it. Emblematic of the special qualities of this process is the work of Jack Metzger (pictured at the top of this post), a shop owner who seems to just really like to collect odd, old stuff and mess around with it. His installation in the show reveals a discerning eye, a sense of wit and a reverence for the integrity of a good, mysterious object. It’s also great fun.

The mounted text that introduces the show makes the point that “the wall between folk and fine art has been crumbling for some time, and inhabitants of both sides have been finding much common ground.” Indeed, one would honestly have to admit that, without peeking first at a resume, there’s no way to tell which of these people is on which side of that fading divide.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

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