Posts Tagged ‘David Brickman’

“Lit” @ Albany International Airport Gallery [Get Visual]

Tuesday, August 25th, 2015
Scott Nelson Foster, Real and Imaginary Houses 12 - oil on panel

Scott Nelson Foster, “Real and Imaginary Houses 12″ – oil on panel

Review by David Brickman

The sky was performing spectacularly at the end of a stormy day, which provided the ideal preparation for Lit, a theme show about phenomena of light at Albany International Airport Gallery that runs through Sunday, September 13. As with all the shows presented at this generous venue, Lit is intelligent and friendly, and features outstanding artists from the greater Capital Region as both a showcase of regional talent and an oasis of uplifting culture for weary travelers.

But you don’t have to be traveling to enjoy these exhibitions – the gallery area is open to the public, parking is free for the first half-hour, and the hours (7am-11pm daily) make it the most accessible high-quality art space anywhere. I was drawn to this show particularly by the inclusion of a few of my favorite artists from around these parts, but also by the theme. After all, without light, we wouldn’t exist.

Lit features six artists and a collaborative: a spare number, yet enough to cover a lot of bases here, including sculpture, industrial design, two extremely different approaches to photography, drawing, painting and projection. The work in the show is approximately evenly divided between color and monochrome, with most of the color coming from the palettes of sculptor Victoria Palermo and painter Scott Nelson Foster.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

Advertisement

ArtBeat: “Roz Chast: Cartoon Memoirs” @ Norman Rockwell Museum [Get Visual]

Tuesday, August 4th, 2015
A New Yorker cover drawing by Roz Chast

A New Yorker cover drawing by Roz Chast

Review by David Brickman

Who doesn’t love Roz Chast? Her quirky take on life, as seen in countless New Yorker cartoons and covers, is the essence of contemporary American neurosis and it makes us laugh in recognition of our own foibles (or, more likely, those of our friends and relatives).

So, one recent lovely summer day we took a trip to Stockbridge to enjoy Roz Chast: Cartoon Memoirs at the Norman Rockwell Museum – and were immediately immersed in Roz’s world. And I don’t just mean immersed via the scads of drawings and artifacts on view. I mean immersed as in, by pure chance, we ran into Roz’s cousin Nancy, from Albany, who knew one of my sisters in Jewish youth group about 50 years ago, along with Nancy’s husband, and, yes, they were depicted rather accurately in a family group portrait included in the Memoirs on display.

It used to be you wouldn’t be surprised to run into one of Norman Rockwell’s former child models in Stockbridge – but this was a Roz Chast show in 2015, so we got cousin Nancy instead, and it was even better.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Maxfield Parrish @ the Fenimore Art Museum [Get Visual]

Wednesday, July 29th, 2015
Maxfield Parrish - Masquerade oil on board 1922

Maxfield Parrish – Masquerade oil on board 1922

Review by David Brickman

If you think an exhibition of work by an early-20th-century illustrator with broad commercial appeal is not to be taken seriously, think again. “Maxfield Parrish: Art of Light and Illusion,” on view at Cooperstown’s Fenimore Art Museum through September 7, is a knockout.

Maxfield Parrish was the most popular and highest paid commercial artist of his time and, judging from the art, artifacts and facts on display here, he earned it. While skill alone never makes great art, it can’t hurt – and Parrish had enough skill for 10 great artists. Initially educated through his artist father’s tutelage and a seminal two-year European sojourn as a teen, Parrish first took an architecture degree, then went to study under Howard Pyle, himself a memorable illustrator of the day, before embarking on a career that revolutionized the field of commercial art reproduction.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

REVIEW: “Truro Light: A Journey from Ocean to Bay” by Joseph Schuyler [Get Visual]

Monday, July 20th, 2015
Joseph Schuyler: Harbor View, Evening

Joseph Schuyler: Harbor View, Evening

Review by David Brickman

The spirit of Joseph Schuyler, who died of cancer in January, shines brightly throughout the beautiful book Truro Light: A Journey from Ocean to Bay. Schuyler, a photographer based in Delmar, was able to plan the book (his first) but, sadly, did not live to see it published. It’s fitting that it tells the story of a journey, and that its subject is a place that held deep personal importance for Schuyler, the second-to-last town out on Cape Cod.

I knew Joe for a long time, so this will not be an objective review, but I can attest that some of my in-laws who live on the Cape, were enthralled by his poetic vision of an endlessly beautiful natural world. In a succinct, punchy introduction, Schuyler says “my goal is for you to be able to experience for yourself the sense of this remarkable place,” and he accomplishes that goal handily, but not without also imbuing our experience with the sense of how he sees and feels about his muse.

Schuyler’s vision as a photographer has always been eclectic – he was widely known for work in black and white that recorded decades of productions by Albany’s Capital Repertory Theatre, did catalog work, sold pictures to commercial stock agencies and regularly exhibited fine art prints – and that is also true in this book. We see landscapes, nature details, architecture and abstracts along the journey, and in a signature Schuyler touch, a lot of the pictures are taken in low light, rather than the blazing sun that draws so many to this ocean shore.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: “Walter Launt Palmer: Painting the Moment” @ Albany Institute of History & Art [Get Visual]

Tuesday, July 14th, 2015
Wheat and Poppies, 1889-90 pastel on paper

Wheat and Poppies, 1889-90 pastel on paper

Everybody knows the blockbuster show of the summer is Van Gogh at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown – all the more reason you should check out the work of his Albany contemporary, Walter Launt Palmer, on view at the Albany Institute of History & Art through August 16. Born into an artistic family in 1854 (Vincent was one year older), Palmer started early and enjoyed a long, successful painting career. At first he held to the Victorian mode, but by the 1880s he was a full-on American Impressionist, no doubt influenced by the same movement that brought us the ever astonishing Van Gogh.

This comprehensive exhibition of Palmer’s three significant series fills the big upstairs gallery of the Institute, which owns most of the paintings presented here (a select few are borrowed from private collectors). It begins with early still life and nature sketches, revealing a very skilled hand that would later be put to the particular task of painting lavish interiors. Two of those highly detailed works that he was regularly commissioned to make depict rooms in the house that gave Arbor Hill its name (now known as the Ten Broeck Mansion) and, with their dark, Victorian air, show why Palmer eventually stopped this pursuit – it was ruining his vision.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ART: Summer Shows to See [Get Visual]

Monday, July 6th, 2015
Van Gogh and Nature will be at The Clark through Sept. 13

Van Gogh and Nature will be at The Clark through Sept. 13

Previews by David Brickman

Just like that, July 4th is over, and it feels like summer will be soon be a distant memory, too. A bunch of museum exhibitions ought to be part of those memories, if you can organize it, with Van Gogh and Nature at Williamstown’s Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute through September 13 topping the list.

Other shows not to be missed include: Roz Chast: Cartoon Memoirs at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge through October 26. The sardonic and self-deprecating New Yorker cartoonist is about as far from The Saturday Evening Post as you can get – which is why I can’t wait to see this show in Rockwell’s house.

Near Stockbridge is Boston Sculptors Gallery at Chesterwood 2015, featuring 24 Boston-area sculptors’ responses to the work, estate and gardens of Lincoln Memorial sculptor Daniel Chester French, through October 12.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

Fence 50 @ ACCR: Democracy in Action [Get Visual]

Monday, June 15th, 2015
Fence 50 installation view - Photos provided by the Arts Center of the Capital Region

Fence 50 installation view – Photos provided by the Arts Center of the Capital Region

Review by David Brickman

It’s been 50 years, and the Fence Show is still going strong at The Arts Center of the Capital Region in Troy. I can remember in the early ’80s hanging the works on the spikes of the wrought-iron fence that gave the show its name, and it retains the wide-open feeling it had then of being a show for the people.

This year’s edition attracted 382 entries from a total of 237 artists, 40 of which were submitted by 33 K-12 students, and as is the tradition, all are on display in a jam-packed salon presentation (as seen in the photo above) through June 27. Such clutter would require a stepladder – and a lot of time – to properly peruse, but that’s what juror Julie Lohnes (curator of Union College’s collections and Mandeville Gallery) must have done in order to choose works for the Fence Select edition of the show and designate the prizes.

Such a democratic enterprise has its pluses and its minuses. The only requirement for inclusion is membership in the ACCR; it appears submissions were limited to two per artist, and I’m guessing there was a size limit – but otherwise, if you brought it, it got in. The result: Everybody gets to participate (yay!) but a fair amount of truly awful work is thereby presented, and even the best work pretty much gets overwhelmed by the swirling mass of media in the show.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

Studio Visit: David Arsenault [Get Visual]

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2015
Center of Attention - Oil on canvas by David Arsenault

Center of Attention – Oil on canvas by David Arsenault

By David Brickman

His work has been compared to that of Edward Hopper. He was voted “Best Visual Artist” by the readers of Metroland in 2002. And as a past president and Oakroom Artists stalwart for many years, he has shown a lot in Schenectady and just about everywhere else a painter can in the Capital Region. But David Arsenault has moved on – to Rockport, Mass. – and he’s not looking back.

I recently caught up with Arsenault in his newly opened gallery in Rockport, a sweet seacoast town on Cape Ann with beautiful harbors, rocky sea walls, inviting cafes, many galleries and a long history of resident painters. He moved there only last fall but has already immersed himself in the cultural scene and staked his claim to the town’s iconic “Motif #1,” a satisfyingly geometric red fishing shack (seen in the painting reproduced above).

Arsenault was pushed to this decision by a helpful interruption to a long career in publishing (he was trained at Sage College of Albany as a graphic designer) and pulled by an equally helpful wife who has often relocated and was ready to do it again. They landed well, renting a nifty wooden house in town and the crisp space that houses the gallery, where Arsenault has a well-lit painting loft and lots of nice walls to display his finished work, situated a stone’s throw from the Motif on a charming, touristy stretch called Bearskin Neck.

Click here to read the rest at Get Visual.

Cartoonist John CaldwellHolly & EvanCaffe LenaAdvertise on Nippertown!Berkshire On StageArtist Charles HaymesLeave Regular Radio BehindKeep Albany BoringThe LindaHudson SoundsAlbany PoetsRamblin Jug Stompers