Posts Tagged ‘David Brickman’

In Brief: Ramersdorfer and Van Alstine at LGAP [Get Visual]

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014
A view of Confluence of Opposites III at Lake George Arts Project featuring Storm Warning II, left, and Sisyphean Circle, right, by John Van Alstine

A view of Confluence of Opposites III at Lake George Arts Project
featuring Storm Warning II, left, and Sisyphean Circle, right, by John Van Alstine

Review by David Brickman

The idea of a show of only sculpture shouldn’t seem at all radical, but it is uncommon enough that it bears noting. And when such a show is presented by equal partners in a domestic relationship, each with significant international showing experience, at the best little public gallery in our region, it is noteworthy indeed.

Caroline Ramersdorfer and John Van Alstine are not opposites at all, despite the flowery title of their well-wrought exhibition, “Confluence of Opposites III,” at the Lake George Arts Project’s Courthouse Gallery; rather, they share similar characteristics that are more significant than nationality or gender or material or technique. Both work in three dimensions but really emphasize a frontal view of their carefully assembled compositions; both combine strict geometry with naturalistic forms; and both work in dramatic, abstract gestures.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

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Catching Up with the Albany Institute [Get Visual]

Friday, September 12th, 2014
A view of the Small + Seductive installation

A view of the Small + Seductive installation

By David Brickman

We’ve all been there – you’re aware of a show you know you want to see, and it has a long run, so you leave it till later because you know you have plenty of time to catch it before it closes … and then, inevitably, time goes by and, in the best of circumstances, you catch the show on its last day – or, more likely, miss it forever.

That’s how, on Sunday, I caught the last day of a fine show of five photographers at the Albany Institute of History & Art, and then took the opportunity to peruse an ongoing exhibition called Small + Seductive, which continues through September 28. Featuring about 50 works of art (a few of which are multiple-piece series) by 37 artists, Small + Seductive is the third in a recent series of shows from AIHA’s collection of contemporary art. The first of that trio included only photographs (full disclosure: two of those were mine) while the second was made up of large-scale work in more traditional fine art media.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

“Body Language” and “Homespun” Inhabit Public Spaces [Get Visual]

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014
Sang Wook Lee: Fork and Knife, 2014, silk, silkscreen  and hand embroidered cotton thread

Sang Wook Lee: Fork and Knife, 2014, silk, silkscreen
and hand embroidered cotton thread

Reviews by David Brickman

When Howard Schultz bought Starbucks in 1983, his goal for the business was to provide “a third place between work and home,” where people would meet, work and relax, thereby forming a sense of community in a coffee-shop setting. A similar process goes on in art spaces, which can range from elegant museums to commercial galleries to – you got it – coffee shops, and which also provide the opportunity to form a sense of community. The greater Capital Region offers many options in that range, and they all contribute significantly to a vibrant scene that I think is underappreciated both within and beyond this geography.

Get Visual aims to explore and expound upon that scene (with occasional digressions beyond), and I am pleased to be returning to it after a long hiatus. This post will be the first of many to come under a new plan to write as often as possible around my full-time job – probably just once or twice a month but, at least, regularly. Please spread the word to your interested friends.

Two shows that recently caught my attention happen to share important characteristics, though they are distinct. Presented neither in museum nor commercial settings, these shows each occupy a type of “third place” in the exhibition realm: spaces that are devoted to significant public purposes apart from art, but which also host high-quality, curated exhibitions.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Best Shows of 2011 [Get Visual]

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011
Jeanne Pissarro: Cocotte, Reading

Camille Pissarro: Cocotte, Reading

It’s a time for looking forward and a time for looking back. As I check last year’s Best Shows post, it amazes me how much things have changed as well as how much they have remained the same, at least for Get Visual.

At this time a year ago, I was crowing about how much traffic had increased on the site during its second full year. Well, this third year has seen the traffic rate double, tallying about 40,000 page views in 2011, with a peak of just under 5,000 for the month of November. Admittedly, a good number of those are probably just folks in Uzbekistan trolling for Norman Rockwell images to steal – but, hey, I’m not choosy!

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

Dualities: Martha Bone and Bart Gulley at Architecture for Art [Get Visual]

Friday, December 9th, 2011
Painting by Bart Gulley from Black and Blue series

Painting by Bart Gulley from Black and Blue series

On a recent visit to Architecture for Art in Hillsdale, Bart Gulley and I discussed dualities as I perused his two-person show with Martha Bone in the two-floor exhibition space. It was our first meeting and my first time at AforA, so there was a lot to take in and digest. AforA director Liane Torre was also on hand, explaining the unlikely genesis a year ago of this brick-and-mortar setting from a longer-term, ongoing web-based project of the same name.

Gulley’s work first caught my eye in the 2011 Exhibition by Artists of the Mohawk Hudson Region at the Albany Institute of History & Art (see review here); he makes Modernist paintings and collages with great purity, having evolved from a more Expressionist style in what appears to be a reductive maturation process. The work is crisp, clear, and somewhat dry at times, but seethes with a passion beneath the expertly rendered surfaces.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Victoria Palermo: RAUM at John Davis Gallery (and other Hudson shows) [Get Visual]

Friday, December 2nd, 2011
Victoria Palermo: cant and wont

Victoria Palermo: cant and wont

Here’s a heads-up for serious followers of contemporary art: There’s less than a week left to see the exhibition Victoria Palermo: RAUM at John Davis Gallery in Hudson, and you don’t want to miss it. If Palermo is new to you, this is as good a time as any to start following her work; or if, like me, you’ve followed her career for decades, you will be deeply gratified to see this amazing new work.

Palermo (no relation to Blinky), has always worked intimately with color – painted onto found sticks, poured onto paper from a nail-polish bottle, printed in patterns like wallpaper or, in this case, infused into the jellylike body of sheets of pure silicone rubber. Equally, Palermo works with form – her work relates to abstract approaches, but never completely leaves the referential realm – and she is as much a designer as she is an artist. In other words, she has always carefully constructed her pieces, even though there is also a degree of expressive freedom in them.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Kiki Smith and Whiting Tennis @ The Tang [Get Visual]

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011
Kiki Smith: I Myself Have Seen It @ The Tang Teaching Museum

Two artists of both shared and contrasting sensibilities are presented in solo shows at Skidmore College’s Tang Teaching Museum through the end of the year. Kiki Smith is by far the more famous and influential of the two; her show did not originate at the Tang, having been brought in from the Henry Art Gallery at the University of Washington in Seattle. Whiting Tennis, who hails from Seattle himself, is the subject of a Tang “Opener,” whereby the museum’s curators make a point of introducing an artist not previously broadly exposed in this area. So we have the known and the unknown side by side; the Seattle connection may be intended or not.

I Myself Have Seen It: Photography and Kiki Smith includes a very great number of photographs, but it also features sculptures, drawings, prints and mixed media, all of which are what the artist is widely known for producing. She is considered a feminist, in that her work runs counter to male-dominated viewpoints regarding the female body in art, and she is clearly very much of her time – a child of the ’60s and ’70s, wild and undisciplined in many ways.

The installation of I Myself Have Seen It is highly structured, however (see view at the top of this post), prominently featuring a narrow ledge at the bottom edge of the gallery’s walls that supports an array of countless 4×6-inch color prints in minimal plastic box-frames, running like a subtitled narrative below the entire text of the exhibition. On the walls are many larger, properly framed photographs, as well as the other works, in great big groups and sequences.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Richard Deon: Paradox and Conformity @ ACCR, Troy [Get Visual]

Monday, November 21st, 2011
Richard Deon: Paradox and Conformity (Photo by Richard Deon)

Richard Deon: Paradox and Conformity (Photo by Richard Deon)

You probably remember the Richard Dreyfuss character in the film Close Encounters of the Third Kind, whose obsession with a curious monolithic shape takes over his life. Another Richard D. has a similar obsession, as evidenced by a fascinating solo exhibition at the Arts Center of the Capital Region in Troy titled Richard Deon: Paradox and Conformity.

The show represents an extremely adept artist with a conceptualist’s thought processes, an installation artist’s approach, and an illustrator’s skill, who is not afraid to employ a wide range of media (acrylic on canvas, sculpture, collage, inkjet) to articulate his vision. And a rather peculiar vision it is, drawing heavily from elementary-school primers, historical references, and ideas about painting and corporate culture, just to name a few obvious influences.

Click to read the rest of this story at Get Visual.

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