Posts Tagged ‘David Brickman’

ArtBeat: Best Shows of 2011 [Get Visual]

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011
Jeanne Pissarro: Cocotte, Reading

Camille Pissarro: Cocotte, Reading

It’s a time for looking forward and a time for looking back. As I check last year’s Best Shows post, it amazes me how much things have changed as well as how much they have remained the same, at least for Get Visual.

At this time a year ago, I was crowing about how much traffic had increased on the site during its second full year. Well, this third year has seen the traffic rate double, tallying about 40,000 page views in 2011, with a peak of just under 5,000 for the month of November. Admittedly, a good number of those are probably just folks in Uzbekistan trolling for Norman Rockwell images to steal – but, hey, I’m not choosy!

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

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Dualities: Martha Bone and Bart Gulley at Architecture for Art [Get Visual]

Friday, December 9th, 2011
Painting by Bart Gulley from Black and Blue series

Painting by Bart Gulley from Black and Blue series

On a recent visit to Architecture for Art in Hillsdale, Bart Gulley and I discussed dualities as I perused his two-person show with Martha Bone in the two-floor exhibition space. It was our first meeting and my first time at AforA, so there was a lot to take in and digest. AforA director Liane Torre was also on hand, explaining the unlikely genesis a year ago of this brick-and-mortar setting from a longer-term, ongoing web-based project of the same name.

Gulley’s work first caught my eye in the 2011 Exhibition by Artists of the Mohawk Hudson Region at the Albany Institute of History & Art (see review here); he makes Modernist paintings and collages with great purity, having evolved from a more Expressionist style in what appears to be a reductive maturation process. The work is crisp, clear, and somewhat dry at times, but seethes with a passion beneath the expertly rendered surfaces.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Victoria Palermo: RAUM at John Davis Gallery (and other Hudson shows) [Get Visual]

Friday, December 2nd, 2011
Victoria Palermo: cant and wont

Victoria Palermo: cant and wont

Here’s a heads-up for serious followers of contemporary art: There’s less than a week left to see the exhibition Victoria Palermo: RAUM at John Davis Gallery in Hudson, and you don’t want to miss it. If Palermo is new to you, this is as good a time as any to start following her work; or if, like me, you’ve followed her career for decades, you will be deeply gratified to see this amazing new work.

Palermo (no relation to Blinky), has always worked intimately with color – painted onto found sticks, poured onto paper from a nail-polish bottle, printed in patterns like wallpaper or, in this case, infused into the jellylike body of sheets of pure silicone rubber. Equally, Palermo works with form – her work relates to abstract approaches, but never completely leaves the referential realm – and she is as much a designer as she is an artist. In other words, she has always carefully constructed her pieces, even though there is also a degree of expressive freedom in them.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Kiki Smith and Whiting Tennis @ The Tang [Get Visual]

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011
Kiki Smith: I Myself Have Seen It @ The Tang Teaching Museum

Two artists of both shared and contrasting sensibilities are presented in solo shows at Skidmore College’s Tang Teaching Museum through the end of the year. Kiki Smith is by far the more famous and influential of the two; her show did not originate at the Tang, having been brought in from the Henry Art Gallery at the University of Washington in Seattle. Whiting Tennis, who hails from Seattle himself, is the subject of a Tang “Opener,” whereby the museum’s curators make a point of introducing an artist not previously broadly exposed in this area. So we have the known and the unknown side by side; the Seattle connection may be intended or not.

I Myself Have Seen It: Photography and Kiki Smith includes a very great number of photographs, but it also features sculptures, drawings, prints and mixed media, all of which are what the artist is widely known for producing. She is considered a feminist, in that her work runs counter to male-dominated viewpoints regarding the female body in art, and she is clearly very much of her time – a child of the ’60s and ’70s, wild and undisciplined in many ways.

The installation of I Myself Have Seen It is highly structured, however (see view at the top of this post), prominently featuring a narrow ledge at the bottom edge of the gallery’s walls that supports an array of countless 4×6-inch color prints in minimal plastic box-frames, running like a subtitled narrative below the entire text of the exhibition. On the walls are many larger, properly framed photographs, as well as the other works, in great big groups and sequences.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Richard Deon: Paradox and Conformity @ ACCR, Troy [Get Visual]

Monday, November 21st, 2011
Richard Deon: Paradox and Conformity (Photo by Richard Deon)

Richard Deon: Paradox and Conformity (Photo by Richard Deon)

You probably remember the Richard Dreyfuss character in the film Close Encounters of the Third Kind, whose obsession with a curious monolithic shape takes over his life. Another Richard D. has a similar obsession, as evidenced by a fascinating solo exhibition at the Arts Center of the Capital Region in Troy titled Richard Deon: Paradox and Conformity.

The show represents an extremely adept artist with a conceptualist’s thought processes, an installation artist’s approach, and an illustrator’s skill, who is not afraid to employ a wide range of media (acrylic on canvas, sculpture, collage, inkjet) to articulate his vision. And a rather peculiar vision it is, drawing heavily from elementary-school primers, historical references, and ideas about painting and corporate culture, just to name a few obvious influences.

Click to read the rest of this story at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Michael Bierut: 30 Years/90 Notebooks @ Esther Massry Gallery [Get Visual]

Friday, November 11th, 2011
Michael Bierut @ Esther Massry Gallery

By Sara Tack

It’s not often that a graphic design show appears in a gallery or a museum and even less often that one shows up in the Capital Region. That’s why it is pretty exciting to see a show of the magnitude of Michael Bierut: 30 Years/90 Notebooks get curated specifically for The College of Saint Rose’s Esther Massry Gallery in Albany.

Bierut, a partner in the renowned design consultancy Pentagram, has had a brilliant career, designing for a host of national and international clients. He is the author of 79 Short Essays on Design and founder of the popular online journal Design Observer. He’s a senior critic at Yale School of Art and frequent guest speaker at design conferences and organizations across the country. His work has won every design award there is to win, including the prestigious American Institute of Graphic Arts medal.

What distinguishes Bierut’s work from much of the design we see on a daily basis is that his pieces use clever, conceptual twists that create messages we have to think twice about. His ability to do this so poignantly is grounded in his knowledge of the subject at hand, his understanding of how to use modernist form to imply meaning, and a natural gift: intuitive wit.

Click to read the rest of this story at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Mark McCarty: Skin @ Opalka Gallery [Get Visual]

Friday, November 4th, 2011
Mark McCarty: Skin @ Opalka Gallery

It is appropriate that the exhibition Mark McCarty: Skin at Sage College of Albany’s Opalka Gallery begins with a self-portrait, because this show is as much about McCarty as it is about the many people depicted in it. Long awaited (McCarty’s last solo show – aside from a wonderful mini-exhibition of iPhone pictures that just ended at McGreevy ProLab – was in 2004), comprehensive (the show presents 35 pieces, 36 if you count the one that is, inexplicably, included twice) and focused (all the works are black-and-white portraits) Skin happened because Opalka Director Jim Richard Wilson recognized that it needed to happen.

McCarty has been making both personal and commercial photographs for over 30 years, and both have brought him considerable recognition. But the effort to mount a major art exhibition is easy to leave aside when you are dealing with clients, raising a family, meeting deadlines. So McCarty continued to make the personal work – that’s essential – but has tended to only show it in dribs and drabs, usually at one or another regional group exhibition.

Now, we have the opportunity to look at a broad and deep slice of those pictures – still limited to a particular long-term project or two, but a good choice was made to present a very personal segment of the total output, rather than a more diverse survey. It tells a deeply compelling story of lives written on the skin of those living in it, and of McCarty’s place amid those lives as participant, observer, and compassionate collaborator.

Click to read the rest of this story at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: LOL @ Albany Airport Gallery [Get Visual]

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011
At left, Granny Panties for My Ex-Girlfriend by Benjamin Entner; at right Self Portrait by Spring Hofeldt

At left, Granny Panties for My Ex-Girlfriend by Benjamin Entner; at right Self Portrait by Spring Hofeldt

In a way, the Albany International Airport Gallery is like an ongoing Whitney Biennial of the Capital Region. Curator Sharon Bates mounts just two shows a year, usually around a pithy theme, and she often populates these shows with work by artists she’s spotted at other venues around the area, in a sort of sifting and consolidation process.

The downside of this approach is that regular viewers of local galleries and museums will encounter things in these shows that they’ve already seen before, sometimes quite recently. But those are not the viewers the Airport Gallery targets; rather, Bates creates for an audience of travelers, many of whom are not from around here and will never venture beyond the terminal as they seek ways to kill time between flights.

And, in more than 10 years of honing that aim, Bates has adopted a formula that really works – even achieving national recognition for excellence in cultural programming at airports. So, it’s no surprise that the new show at the Airport Gallery, titled LOL, is fresh, funny and – yes – surprising, despite including some familiar work.

Click to read the rest of this story at Get Visual.

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