Posts Tagged ‘Cambridge’

Blues & Brews @ Hubbard Hall on Saturday [Berkshire on Stage]

Friday, February 24th, 2017
The Roadside Blues Band

The Roadside Blues Band

Beat the winter blues and swing into spring at Blues & Brews – a smokin’ hot fundraiser for Hubbard Hall in Cambridge.

Beginning at 6pm on Saturday (February 25), listen and dance to the hot sounds of the Roadside Blues Band and enjoy chili, corn bread and desserts. All ages are invited, although ID is required to partake of the cash bar for beer & wine.

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“Whispering Bones” Makes for a Creepy Hubbard Hall-o-Ween [Berkshire on Stage]

Wednesday, October 26th, 2016

whisper

Once again, Kelvin Keraga hosts an evening of creepy and chilling tales at Cambridge’s Hubbard Hall, told by some of Greater Nippertown’s best storytellers. For hundreds of years writers have taken us by the hand and led us into old houses filled with apparitions: phantoms woven from memories and dreams and the dark core of our humanity. These tales are explorations of our souls, where characters cross the line between life and death, caught in situations that often draw out their deepest feelings. The supernatural teaches us what is natural: frailty and strength, loss and recovery. The nurturing power of imagination.

Saturday’s Whispering Bones is a great mix of great stories and the proceeds from the show will benefit Hubbard Hall’s Arts Education Scholarship program. This program helps to ensure that no student at Hubbard Hall is ever turned away from a class based on financial limitations.

This year’s Whispering Bones cast includes Siri Allison, Jack Boggan, Barbara Chepaitis, Kelvin Keraga, Stephanie Moffett-Hynds, Erin Ouellette, Tony Pallone and Catherine Seeley.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

20% Theatre Co. Explores Queer & Trans Experience [Berkshire on Stage]

Friday, September 30th, 2016
From “The Naked I: Self Defined” at Hubbard Hall and Bennington College on October 1.

From “The Naked I: Self Defined” at Hubbard Hall and Bennington College on Saturday (October 1)

Hubbard Hall in Cambridge has partnered with Bennington College in Vermont to bring area audiences cutting-edge monologues and short scenes that explore the queer and trans experience. Presented by 20% Theatre Company Twin Cities from Minneapolis, The Naked I: Self Defined features brand new, never before seen monologues, short scenes, movement pieces, spoken word poems, short film and more, and includes the contributions of over 70 artists.

Inspired by The Naked I: Monologues from Beyond the Binary by Tobias K. Davis, a production that explored the bodies and experiences of transgender, gender-queer and intersex individuals (which 20% Theatre Company produced back in 2009), the company has created, and will continue to create and produce a new NAKED I production every two years that takes the idea of a monologue-based play to a new level and boldly explains and explores the land beyond ‘male’ and ‘female’.

Executive and Artistic Director David Snider says, “We have teens in our community realizing their LGBTQ or Trans identities who have few resources for support – and few opportunities to see their stories on local stages. This is a rare and much-needed foray into performance directly addressing issues from the LGBTQ and Transgender communities, and I’m thrilled to be able to offer it at the Hall.”

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

OPERA REVIEW: “Madama Butterfly” @ Hubbard Hall [Berkshire on Stage]

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016
Bei-Bei Guan

Bei-Bei Guan

Opera review by Gail M. Burns

When Alexina Jones founded Hubbard Hall Opera Theater in 2008, one of her goals was to “engage and build rural audiences for opera through offering affordable, intimate, high-quality musical and theatrical performances.” This she achieved immediately when HHOT’s premiere production of Mozart’s Cosi fan tutte started out playing to 85 percent capacity its first few performances, and then it sold out.

This year, which is Jones’ last at Hubbard Hall as she is moving on in her arts management career, 25 people were turned away from the open dress rehearsal of Puccini’s Madama Butterfly that I attended. The Hall only seats 120. A “rural audience” for opera has not only been engaged, they have been enthused. In case you are not sufficiently impressed, Jones is well under age 40.

Jones started out producing truncated, comedic, family-friendly operas – although the singers and musicians have always been professionals – on the theory that full-length grand opera might scare off first-time opera-goers. And now they are packing the house for full-length productions of Rigoletto and Madama Butterfly.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

“An Iliad,” Homer’s Epic Story of Undying Love, Chaos & Humanity @ Hubbard Hall [Berkshire on Stage]

Thursday, April 23rd, 2015

AnIlliad

By Larry Murray

Masterfully adapted by Lisa Peterson and Denis O’Hare from Robert Fagles’s acclaimed translation, An Iliad adapts Homer’s Trojan War epic into a gripping piece of theater that captures both the heroism and horror of war. This fierce, funny piece will ignite your imagination and leave you breathless. It stars Jeannine Haas and is directed by Sheila Siragusa at Hubbard Hall in Cambridge, in a co-production with Pauline Productions.

Greek poet Homer’s 8th-century B.C. epic, “The Iliad,” told the story of the mythical 10-year Trojan War, featuring two warrior heroes, the wrathful Greek, Achilles, and noble Hector, the peace-loving Trojan prince. Now, a lone poet travels through time, wearily sharing her often-anguished memories of that war-mongering, vengeful time nearly three millennia ago.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

Creeps, Deceits and Delusions Collide in Molière’s “Tartuffe” at Hubbard Hall [Berkshire on Stage]

Friday, February 20th, 2015
Don’t let the talk of high morals fool you, as with so many supposedly religious men, this is a wolf in sheep’s clothing.

Don’t let the talk of high morals fool you, as with so many supposedly religious men, this is a wolf in sheep’s clothing.

From Cambridge comes news that the Hubbard Hall Theater Company is staging one of Moliere’s best known and loved comedies, Tartuffe. It is being directed by John Hadden, and will run weekends beginning tonight (February 20) through Sunday, March 15. It’s an oldie but goodie, a satiric masterpiece that is full of laughs, insights and naughty plot twists.

Tartuffe is a scoundrel who can don any pose and become a master of it. Professing extreme piety, he is taken into the household of Orgon, a wealthy man. Under the guise of ministering to the family’s spiritual and moral needs, he almost destroys Orgon’s family. Hypocrisy gone wild. Religious posturing, deceit. Legal entanglements. Wonderful absurdity.

Considered quite scandalous when first produced in 1664, Tartuffe is now is one of the most famous theatrical comedies by Molière. The characters of Tartuffe, Elmire and Orgon are considered among the greatest classical theater roles. In response to criticism of the time, Moliere responded, “The comic is the outward and visible form that nature’s bounty has attached to everything unreasonable, so that we should see, and avoid, it. To know the comic we must know the rational, of which it denotes the absence and we must see wherein the rational consists . . . incongruity is the heart of the comic.”

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

A Fearless “Romeo and Juliet” Takes to the Road from Hubbard Hall to the People of NY & VT [Berkshire on Stage]

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014
Romeo and Juliet played by actors who are teens themselves.

Romeo and Juliet played by actors who are teens themselves.

Hubbard Hall Center for the Arts is about to set out on its 20th Free Outdoor Shakespeare Tour. The acting company is bringing Shakespeare’s most famous and popular play not only to its own community but to many other cities and towns in New York and Vermont.

Two young kids in love, running towards each other quicker than they can think…
With the world against them and their hearts entwined,
Their families fight,
Adults try to drive them apart,
Until tragedy – and wondering – how could this have happened?

This fun, fast-paced Romeo and Juliet, directed by Hubbard Hall’s new Executive Director David Snider, will bring the world of the play to vibrant life in 10 beautiful settings. With minimal props and costumes, the focus will be on the words, the actions, the actors and the setting. Each site will inform the production, with an emphasis on a fierce, fearless tackling of Shakespeare’s world and words. Actual teenagers will play Romeo and Juliet. With a mix of young talent and seasoned professionals, this company will mix Shakespeare’s world with our own, exploring how age, authority, religion and family continue to shape us – and what can happen when generations collide, or at least fail to communicate.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

Gorgeous Singing, Fun Staging of “The Barber of Seville” from Hubbard Hall Opera in Cambridge, NY [Berkshire on Stage]

Tuesday, August 20th, 2013
The Ensemble at Hubbard Hall Opera Theatre. Photos by Jason Dolmetsch and Alexina Jones.

The Ensemble at Hubbard Hall Opera Theatre. Photos by Jason Dolmetsch and Alexina Jones.

Opera Review and discussion by Gail M. Burns and Larry Murray

Larry Murray: For someone who claims not to like opera very much, you sure seemed to enjoy The Barber of Seville at Hubbard Hall, Gail. Maybe because it was one of the ultimate examples of Opera Buffa which meant it is about things the local Italians could identify with, in language that was drawn from the vernacular.

Gail M. Burns: My great-grandmother, Magdalena Gandolfo, must have been watching over me! But seriously, what’s not to like when handsome gentlemen, and a pair of pretty ladies, are singing and carvorting for my pleasure? The English supertitles kept me clued in to the plot, and the clowning is universal. Was Chico Marx in this one?

Larry: I love that the opera has a delightful story that borders at times on farce. While there are a lot of zany romantic moments, deceit and trickery to keep us involved in the story, it also has some pretty wonderful music. Written in 1816, Gioachino Rossini kept Il barbiere di Siviglia simple and purely comedic, from the settings, to the words and the length – two acts, which means it is shorter than many of the opera seria which can go on and on. The form lasted from about 1700 to 1850. Mozart’s Marriage of Figaro (Le nozze di Figaro, 1786) has more drama and pathos while Donizetti’s Elixer of Love (L’Elisir d’Amore, 1832) is even more romantic. There are a lot of wonderful characters and arias in Barber of Seville, which did you fall in love with?

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

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