Posts Tagged ‘Berkshire Theatre Group’

Berkshire Theatre Group’s 2014 Summer season offers a blend of Classic, Modern Plays [Berkshire on Stage]

Monday, February 24th, 2014
During the course of a season, the Berkshire Theatre Group will offer performances on five different stages in the Berkshires.

During the course of a season, the Berkshire Theatre Group will offer performances on five different stages in the Berkshires.

From Berkshire Theatre Group comes news of their 2014 theatre plans.

“We are producing a full schedule of musicals, plays, and special theatrical performances for another wonderful summer in the Berkshires with a splendid cast and crew of talented artists from across the nation,” said Artistic Director/CEO, Kate Maguire. It includes, she said, “Six extraordinary plays: The Mystery of Irma Vep: A Penny Dreadful, Benefactors, Design for Living, A Hatful of Rain, including two world premieres: Cedars and POE and two wonderful musicals: A Little Night Music and Seussical highlight our schedule and make for an enjoyable mix of masterful and provocative classics and contemporary works. A special week-long performance of A Lover’s Tale spotlighting the works of Giuseppe Verdi, Charles Ludlam and Alexandre Dumas and performances by our summer apprentices, our 86th season will be memorable and entertaining for all.”

Tickets for season pass holders and members are exclusively available starting Friday, February 21 at 10am. Tickets are on sale to all on Wednesday, February 26 at 10am. Summer season passes are available for purchase at $175 for a four-show pass, $250 for a six-show pass, and $225 for a year-round all-stages pass.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

Advertisement

“Mary and Edith” with Kim and Kate and Mary on Stage Together at the Unicorn Theatre [Berkshire on Stage]

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013
(l to r) Kim Taylor, Kate Maguire and Mary Mott.

(l to r) Kim Taylor, Kate Maguire and Mary Mott.

Built on a foundation of success, the Berkshire Theatre Group’s presentation of Mary and Edith: Musings by Women a Century Apart is sure to delight lovers of literature when it is staged at the Unicorn Theatre in Stockbridge. The production opens Friday (October 4) and closes on Sunday, October 20.

Both Roman Fever and From Where I Sit were previously produced at the new works festival, “Made in the Berkshires” in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Due to popular response, BTG is producing the two works as a two-part evening of theatre celebrating the works of women writers in the Berkshires and presents an insightful, dramatic look into the lives of women a century apart.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

Eugene O’Neill’s Pulitzer Winning “Anna Christie” at BTG Aug. 20-31 [Berkshire on Stage]

Monday, August 19th, 2013

Berkshire Theatre Group presents Eugene O’Neill’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play Anna Christie at the Fitzpatrick Main Stage. Opening Night is August 24 at 8pm. Preview performances begin on August 20 at 8pm and the production closes August 31 at 8pm.

Tickets to Anna Christie are $38-$58, all preview tickets are $38. Tickets may be purchased in person at the Colonial Ticket Office at 111 South Street, Pittsfield; at the Fitzpatrick Main Stage Ticket Office at 83 East Main Street, Stockbridge; by calling (413) 997-4444 or online at www.BerkshireTheatreGroup.org. All plays, schedules, casting and prices are subject to change.

“It’s an extremely gripping and suspenseful story, very human and gritty,” says Tony Award and Pulitzer Prize-winning director, David Auburn. “The sexual politics are surprisingly modern, radical even. Anna is a former prostitute who’s trying to leave her past behind, but when she’s rejected for that past she defends herself in some very surprising ways. The play still has the capacity to shock – to make the audience gasp. That’s pretty remarkable 90 years on.”

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

“Same Time, Next Year” at Berkshire Theatre Group still a clever, funny evening of theatre [Berkshire on Stage]

Friday, August 2nd, 2013
Corinna May and David Adkins in Same Time Next Year. Photo by Chris Frisina.

Corinna May and David Adkins in Same Time Next Year. Photo by Chris Frisina.

by Larry Murray

SAME TIME, NEXT YEAR begins in 1950 and charts the relationship of two lovers, Doris and George, who meet once a year for 25 years for an extra-marital love affair. While undeniably sexual, the relationship was also much more than that, it is also the reunion of two old friends. In between these trysts, they neither see nor communicate with each other, reverting to their regular lives, marriages, spouses and children.

The play uses six of these visits, about five years apart to delineate the changes happening in American culture. It ends in 1975, a pivotal point in the transition between the old ways of communitarianism and the new individualism. No play has been better at capturing the ferment leading to the “me decade”. And while it is a wonderful touchstone of the mid 20th Century, when its treatment of unconventional love and contemporary life was new, the play can sometimes seem quite dated. Even these scenes however are capable of stirring up old memories, and there is a genuine simplicity to the storyline which is refreshing in these complicated times.

“You can tell the time has changed, honey, because the bed covers are different,” noted one nearby theatre-goer to her husband. And indeed, the changing of the bedcovers by a trio of maids and a housekeeper was accomplished with some clever choreography and funny business by director Kyle Fabel. He also kept the actors onstage busy pouring coffee, making drinks, getting dressed and undressed, or playing the piano, dashing into the bathroom, and at one point, diving out a window.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

“The Cat and the Canary” to Get Immersive Production at Berkshire Theatre Group’s Unicorn Theatre [Berkshire on Stage]

Monday, July 29th, 2013

The Cat and The Canary

As the clock strikes midnight, the relatives of Cyrus West assemble at his mansion to read his will 20 years after his death. And so begins The Cat and the Canary in what the Berkshire Theatre Group is promising will be a cutting edge production of this classic mystery story. It will be performed at the Unicorn Theatre in Stockbridge opening on August 3 at 8pm. Previews begin August 1 at 8pm and closes on August 24 at 8pm.

This thrilling and cutting edge production of the classic mystery, The Cat and the Canary, is led by Yale School of Drama directing student Ethan Heard. The cast, which features eight Yale School of Drama acting students and returning Brandeis acting student and BTG alumnus, Jonathan Young, will take the audience on an immersive journey to the haunted mansion of Cyrus West filled with frightening and fun surprises around every corner. An homage to classic mysteries and horror films in look and feel, The Cat and the Canary will introduce audiences to the best in up and coming theatrical talent, while providing suspense and entertainment galore.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

Review: Berkshire Theatre Group Tinkers with the Classic “Oklahoma!” at the Colonial [Berkshire on Stage]

Wednesday, July 10th, 2013
An existential wedding cake finale with the entire cast of Oklahoma! (photo: Abby LePage)

An existential wedding cake finale with the entire cast of Oklahoma! (photo: Abby LePage)

Review by Gail M. Burns and Larry Murray

Larry Murray: You know how much I have been hoping that Oklahoma! would be the third hit musical this summer, following On the Town at Barrington Stage and Animal Crackers at Williamstown Theatre Festival. I feel like my souffle had all the perfect ingredients and then just as it comes out of the oven, it collapses.

And I ask myself what the hell happened.

Gail M. Burns: Although I like Oklahoma! I was disappointed way back when the BTG announced it as their summer musical. It just seemed such a safe, uninspired choice.

Larry: Well, let’s do a little bit of detective work and see where things might have gone off track. First the music and lyrics by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. Oklahoma! is a classic, but even at the 1943 opening, the NY Post critic said the songs were too much alike. And is there any 1940′s song whose lyrics are still the cat’s pajamas?

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

THEATER: Jayne Atkinson, Treat Williams Roar and Clash in “The Lion in WInter” [Berkshire on Stage]

Monday, July 8th, 2013

Review by Larry Murray

Treat Williams roars like a lion when his sons challenge him, while Jayne Atkinson quietly lies in wait, watching for her opportunity to strike back at the man responsible for her long confinement.

“What family doesn’t have its ups and downs?” asks Eleanor of Aquitaine in “The Lion in Winter” as the royal plots and plans swirl around King Henry’s palace at Chinon, France. It is Christmas, 1183, and she has been allowed out of prison and back across the channel to join Henry, his mistress Alnis Capet and his three sons Richard, John and Geoffrey. Their invited guest, Philip Capet, King of France, has no idea what an eventful holiday he is in for, since much of the deception and game playing also involves him as well.

Treat Williams as King Henry is truly Lord of the Manor as it is his incredibly fast mind that outwits and outsmarts every half-baked plan his sons come up with, while the fiery Eleanor is smarter than them all, sometimes even building deniability into her treachery.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

Burns and Murray Give Naches to Jonathan Epstein and New Stage for “The Jewish Jester” [Berkshire on Stage]

Thursday, May 16th, 2013
Robert D. Lohbauer (l) and Jonathan Epstein in “The Jewish Jester: A Fable With Music.”

Robert D. Lohbauer (l) and Jonathan Epstein in “The Jewish Jester: A Fable With Music.”

Review by Gail M. Burns and Larry Murray

Gail Burns: I didn’t know quite what to expect from “The Jewish Jester: A Fable With Music,” but with Jonathan Epstein in the leading role, how can you go wrong…

Larry Murray: He may be the lowly servant of the king in this play, but he’s also its star. Between Epstein and Robert Lohbauer, his co-star, it’s a pretty dynamic duo on stage, making a great evening entertainment out of a bit of a mushy play. Its advance publicity pointed out that it is a combination of Elizabethan English and Yiddish, but that is only the tip of the Word Play iceberg. It’s also puns, physical comedy and role reversals.

Gail: I was confused as the dialogue is sometimes Elizabethan, sometimes modern, sometimes in verse, sometimes in prose. I wanted to get my hands on a script to clarify playwright Daniel Klein’s rhyme and reason, but that is one of those perks the press can access that the average ticket-buyer can’t. No one should have waste time in the theater trying to figure out what the playwright is up to structurally.

Larry: As to the play itself, it’s like a sweet tsholnt, a Jewish stew that has been simmering for a long time. Some meshuggener (slightly crazy guy) named Daniel Klein put this concoction together. He’s the guy who wrote (with Thomas Cathcart) “Plato and a Platypus Walked into a Bar.” It takes a creative imagination to come up with a nudnik Jewish Jester and condemned King sharing the same jail cell, yet the whole megillah comes together at the Unicorn Theatre in Stockbridge.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

Cartoonist John CaldwellHolly & EvanCaffe LenaAdvertise on Nippertown!Leave Regular Radio BehindArtist Charles HaymesHudson SoundsKeep Albany BoringBerkshire On StageThe LindaThe Law Office of Paul RappCapital District Habitat For Humanity