Archive for the ‘Books/Readings’ Category

BEST OF 2016: Washington Post’s 10 Best Graphic Novels

Friday, December 30th, 2016

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Yes, it’s that time of year once again – best of the year list-time, that is. We’re gathering together Best of 2016 from media outlets, our own contributors and our readers, too.

Here’s The Washington Post’s round-up of the Best Graphic Novels of 2016, as compiled by Michael Cavna:

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Think Artistically, Read Locally: “SPAC50”

Friday, December 16th, 2016

“SPAC50”
Edited by Field Horne; designed by David Perry
$75
Available at Northshire Bookstore; online at www.spac.org; and by calling SPAC at 518.584.9330

This year the Saratoga Performing Arts Center celebrated its 50th anniversary, and the SPAC folks are wrapping up the year-long celebration with the publication of a limited edition, 350-page commemorative coffee table book. Edited by Spa City historian Field Horne and designed by Saratoga Living’s creative director David Perry, the 12 x 12-inch book explores SPAC’s classical music, dance, pop & rock and educational offerings through 11 themed chapters, featuring more than 450 images and essays by Skidmore professors Denise Warner Limoli (associate professor of dance) and Tom Denny (professor emeritus of music history).

MORE OF THINK ARTISTICALLY, READ LOCALLY:
“MHR-80: Artists of the Mohawk-Hudson Region”
“New York’s Capital Region in 50 Objects”
“Encore: Proctors at 90”

Think Artistically, Read Locally: “MHR-80”

Thursday, December 15th, 2016

“MHR-80: Artists of the Mohawk-Hudson Region”
By Michael Oatman
$30
Book launch event at the Hyde Collection at 5:30pm Friday (December 16); $25 admission includes one copy of the book; $15 without a copy of the book
Also available at the Hyde Collection

The Hyde Collection in Glens Fall unveils a commemorative-edition catalogue celebrating the 80th annual Artists of the Mohawk-Hudson Region exhibition, which is on view through the end of the year showcasing the work of 106 Greater Nippertown artists. The 186-page, full-color book features an ephemeral timeline, essays by Museum Director Erin Coe and MHR curator/juror Michael Oatman, and features each of the artists in the exhibition.

MORE OF THINK ARTISTICALLY, READ LOCALLY:
“New York’s Capital Region in 50 Objects”
“Encore: Proctors at 90”

BEST OF 2016: Chicago Tribunes’ Top Four Poetry Books of the Year

Wednesday, December 14th, 2016

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Yes, it’s that time of year once again – best of the year list-time, that is. We’re gathering together Best of 2016 from media outlets, our own contributors and our readers, too. (Sure, just email ’em to us…)

Here’s The Chicago Tribune’s list of the Four Top Poetry Books as compiled by Michael Robbins:

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Think Artistically, Read Locally: “New York’s Capital Region in 50 Objects”

Wednesday, December 14th, 2016

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“NEW YORK’S CAPITAL REGION IN 50 OBJECTS”
$18.95
Book launch event at the Albany Institute of History and Art at 3-5pm Friday (December 16). Admission is FREE.
Also available at the Albany Institute Museum Shop, the Book House, Market Block Books and Departure at the Albany International Airport

In conjunction with the popular 2015-2016 exhibition of the same name, the Albany Institute of History & Art has published a book focusing on some of Greater Nippertown’s most historical and unique artifacts from Albany Billiard Balls to Troy-Bilt Rototillers. It’s a 122-page, softcover book with two full pages of full-color illustrations and informational text dedicated to each of the 50 chosen objects – including Nipper, of course.

MORE OF THINK ARTISTICALLY, READ LOCALLY:
“Encore: Proctors at 90”

Think Artistically, Read Locally: “Encore: Proctors at 90”

Tuesday, December 13th, 2016

proctors

This week, we’re putting the spotlight on a series of new, locally produced arts books published just in time for the gift-giving season:

“ENCORE: PROCTORS AT 90”
By Richard Lovrich and Michael Eck
$49.95
Book launch events at Proctors’ GE Theatre at 7pm Wednesday (December 14); the Open Door Bookstore at 1pm Saturday (December 17); Universal Preservation Hall at 6pm Friday, February 10. Admission to all book events is FREE.
Also available at Proctors’ Gift Centre, the Open Door Bookstore, Northshire Bookstore, the Book House, Market Block Books; and online at Amazon.com

This month, Proctors marks its 90th anniversary, and in conjunction with the celebration, the Schenectady arts and entertainment complex has published a new, deluxe hardcover photo book, that examines Proctors’ history, but also focuses on Proctors today, and its role in the renewal of downtown Schenectady. The book features more than 100 photographs and is divided into 14 chapters penned by Proctors’ publicist Michael Eck. “This is our story,” says Proctors CEO Philip Morris. “This is a snapshot of who we are right now.”

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Happy Thanksgiving?

Thursday, November 24th, 2016

30 years old and more relevant today than ever…

RIP: Leonard Cohen, 1934-2016

Friday, November 11th, 2016

By Greg Haymes

In the middle of her concert at The Egg’s Swyer Theatre last night, one of her adoring fans informed Amanda Palmer (and the rest of the sold-out crowd) that Leonard Cohen had died. Palmer collapsed on the stage, weeping.

“I loved him,” she eventually explained. “He remains the most inspirational performer I’ve ever seen because he’s so humble.”

And at the end of her three-hour-plus, soul-baring performance, Palmer sat quietly at the grand piano gathering herself together. “Some songs get covered a lot because they’re just that good. And that’s OK…,” she half-whispered, before finally easing tentatively into a elegiac, broken-hearted, tear-stained rendition of “Hallelujah,” a song that I had previously thought I never needed to hear again.

I was wrong. I needed to hear it last night…

I only saw Leonard Cohen perform once, and to be quite honest, I don’t remember much about his music. I was a young man at my first big music fest, the Mariposa Folk Festival at Innis Lake, a big open field some 30 miles north of Toronto. The release of his debut album, Songs of Leonard Cohen, was still months away.

What I do vividly remember, however, is strolling from one workshop to another in the mid-day sun and stumbling across a small, impromptu gathering. I joined them, sitting cross-legged in a circle of maybe 20 people, listening to Cohen’s painfully intimate voice as he read from his novel, “Beautiful Losers,” for an hour or so.

“Do not be a magician,” he read. “Be magic!”

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