Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

ArtBeat: What To See

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

Opening:

Works by Jeff Wigman and Jon Gernon @ Clement Frame Shop

Works by Jeff Wigman and Jon Gernon @ Clement Frame Shop

Real & Unreal @ Clement Art Gallery, Troy. New works by Jon Gernon and Jeff Wigman. Opening reception: Friday, July 31, 6-9pm. (Through August 26)

Peter Ware; A Job for Superman @ Lichtenstein Center for the Arts

Peter Ware; A Job for Superman @ Lichtenstein Center for the Arts

Reimagined! An International Show of Comic and Cartoon Art @ Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield. A show featuring both local and international artists exhibiting re-imagining superheroes in new and creative ways. Opening party: Saturday, August 1, 4-7pm. (Through August 29)

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ArtBeat: Maxfield Parrish @ the Fenimore Art Museum [Get Visual]

Wednesday, July 29th, 2015
Maxfield Parrish - Masquerade oil on board 1922

Maxfield Parrish – Masquerade oil on board 1922

Review by David Brickman

If you think an exhibition of work by an early-20th-century illustrator with broad commercial appeal is not to be taken seriously, think again. “Maxfield Parrish: Art of Light and Illusion,” on view at Cooperstown’s Fenimore Art Museum through September 7, is a knockout.

Maxfield Parrish was the most popular and highest paid commercial artist of his time and, judging from the art, artifacts and facts on display here, he earned it. While skill alone never makes great art, it can’t hurt – and Parrish had enough skill for 10 great artists. Initially educated through his artist father’s tutelage and a seminal two-year European sojourn as a teen, Parrish first took an architecture degree, then went to study under Howard Pyle, himself a memorable illustrator of the day, before embarking on a career that revolutionized the field of commercial art reproduction.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: Troy River Fest Chalk Drawing Competition @ River Street, 6/20/15

Monday, July 27th, 2015

Number-51-Adult-winner-Christine-Masi-Layden-nt

ADULT WINNER: Christine Masi Layden

Photographs by Stanley Johnson

Organizers eliminated some stages and changed the name from the River Street Festival to the Troy River Fest, but one thing that didn’t change was the annual sidewalk chalk drawing competition.

Here are some of the faves that photographer Stanley Johnson captured as he strolled through the fest:

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ArtBeat: What To See

Thursday, July 23rd, 2015

Opening:

Works by Susie Ganch @  Sienna Patti

Works by Susie Ganch @ Sienna Patti

Susie Ganch: Land and Sea @ Sienna Patti Contemporary, Lenox. A solo exhibition of new work by artist and sustainability activist Susie Ganch, whose primary source material is trash, both as physical object—overflowing accumulations of used coffee lids, plastic bags, and unwanted debris—and as conceptual vehicle to investigate our collective habits of consumption. Artist’s reception: Saturday, July 25, 5-7pm. (Through August 16)

George Guarino: Realized @ The MIK Gallery

George Guarino: Realized @ The MIK Gallery

Works in Mind @ The MIK Gallery, Latham. New abstract digital collages by George Guarino. (Through September 4)

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The Story Behind a Billion Dollars in Missing Art… [Berkshire on Stage]

Tuesday, July 21st, 2015
13 works of art worth a billion dollars simply disappeared after they were stolen.

13 works of art worth a billion dollars simply disappeared after they were stolen.

“My father was an artist. Loved Rembrandt, loved Vermeer…So this case is important to me.” Former Boston Globe investigative reporter Stephen Kurkjian, with three Pulitzer Prizes under his belt, will give his audience the low down on “Master Thieves: The Boston Gangsters Who Robbed the Gardner Museum,” the subject of his new book. He will be at the Ventfort Hall Mansion and Gilded Age Museum in Lenox for a Victorian Tea & Talk to tell the story and autograph copies of his book today (Tuesday, July 21) at 4pm.

His subject is the 1990 theft of 13 works of art worth a half billion dollars from Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, a crime he began to cover in 1997 after the FBI failed to solve the case. The works included “The Concert” (the only Vermeer on view in New England) and Rembrandt’s only seascape, “Christ in the Storm on the Sea of Galilee,” as well as sketches by Degas, a Manet portrait and three other Rembrandts. None of these works have appeared since then.

Click to read the rest at Berkshire on Stage.

REVIEW: “Truro Light: A Journey from Ocean to Bay” by Joseph Schuyler [Get Visual]

Monday, July 20th, 2015
Joseph Schuyler: Harbor View, Evening

Joseph Schuyler: Harbor View, Evening

Review by David Brickman

The spirit of Joseph Schuyler, who died of cancer in January, shines brightly throughout the beautiful book Truro Light: A Journey from Ocean to Bay. Schuyler, a photographer based in Delmar, was able to plan the book (his first) but, sadly, did not live to see it published. It’s fitting that it tells the story of a journey, and that its subject is a place that held deep personal importance for Schuyler, the second-to-last town out on Cape Cod.

I knew Joe for a long time, so this will not be an objective review, but I can attest that some of my in-laws who live on the Cape, were enthralled by his poetic vision of an endlessly beautiful natural world. In a succinct, punchy introduction, Schuyler says “my goal is for you to be able to experience for yourself the sense of this remarkable place,” and he accomplishes that goal handily, but not without also imbuing our experience with the sense of how he sees and feels about his muse.

Schuyler’s vision as a photographer has always been eclectic – he was widely known for work in black and white that recorded decades of productions by Albany’s Capital Repertory Theatre, did catalog work, sold pictures to commercial stock agencies and regularly exhibited fine art prints – and that is also true in this book. We see landscapes, nature details, architecture and abstracts along the journey, and in a signature Schuyler touch, a lot of the pictures are taken in low light, rather than the blazing sun that draws so many to this ocean shore.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

ArtBeat: What to See

Thursday, July 16th, 2015

Opening:

Paintings by Jack Walls @ Basilica Hudson

Paintings by Jack Walls @ Basilica Hudson

Jack Walls: Paintings, Et Ceterahttp @ Basilica Hudson, Hudson. Vibrant paintings and selected ephemera by the legendary artist who has been a fixture on the New York creative scene since the early 1980s, working primarily in collage and painting. In addition to his visual work, he is also an established poet and author, most notably for The Ebony Prick of the White Rose’s Thorn, which he will read from on opening night. Opening reception: Friday, July 17, 6-8pm. Closing party and artist discussion: Saturday, August 1, 6-8pm. (Through August 2)

Paintings by Barbara Friedman @ BCB ART

Paintings by Barbara Friedman @ BCB ART

Big Collars @ BCB ART, Hudson. A solo show of paintings by Barbara Friedman that investigate her fascination with Elizabethan ruff collars. Also on view are works by Marcy Rosenblat, Richard Butler, Bill Seaman, Ed Smith, Michael Lindsay-Hogg and others. Artist’s reception: Saturday, July 18, 6-8pm. (Through August 16)

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ArtBeat: “Walter Launt Palmer: Painting the Moment” @ Albany Institute of History & Art [Get Visual]

Tuesday, July 14th, 2015
Wheat and Poppies, 1889-90 pastel on paper

Wheat and Poppies, 1889-90 pastel on paper

Everybody knows the blockbuster show of the summer is Van Gogh at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown – all the more reason you should check out the work of his Albany contemporary, Walter Launt Palmer, on view at the Albany Institute of History & Art through August 16. Born into an artistic family in 1854 (Vincent was one year older), Palmer started early and enjoyed a long, successful painting career. At first he held to the Victorian mode, but by the 1880s he was a full-on American Impressionist, no doubt influenced by the same movement that brought us the ever astonishing Van Gogh.

This comprehensive exhibition of Palmer’s three significant series fills the big upstairs gallery of the Institute, which owns most of the paintings presented here (a select few are borrowed from private collectors). It begins with early still life and nature sketches, revealing a very skilled hand that would later be put to the particular task of painting lavish interiors. Two of those highly detailed works that he was regularly commissioned to make depict rooms in the house that gave Arbor Hill its name (now known as the Ten Broeck Mansion) and, with their dark, Victorian air, show why Palmer eventually stopped this pursuit – it was ruining his vision.

Click to read the rest at Get Visual.

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